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OECD broadband statistics show 10% increase in subscribers
Saturday 12 December 2009 16:31:47 by John Hunt

The OECD have released broadband statistics for up to June 2009 which shows that member countries have increase broadband subscribers to 271 million, an increase of 10% from June 2008, with half of OECD countries having reached penetration of a quarter of inhabitants.

The 30 OECD countries are made up of what are known as high-income economies with a couple of upper-middle income, mainly Europe with North America, Japan, Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

Probably the most obvious statistic is total broadband subscribers with the United States coming top, far above other OECD countries with 81.2 million subscribers. The UK ranks 5th in this (17.7 million) behind Japan, Germany and France. A more useful statistic is the broadband subscribers per 100 inhabitants which shows the percentage of take up in countries. The US fares less well in this, coming 15th with 26.7%, the UK 13th with 28.9%. The top 3 Netherlands, Denmark and Norway grab 38.1%, 37.0% and 34.5% respectively.

Some of the statistics aren't completely up to date, but some interesting comparisons can still be made. September 2008 average advertised download speeds show the UK 15th with 10.6Mbps, far behind the fastest of Japan at 92.8Mbps. Of course the advertised speed does not mean users actually sustain that speed, but it's still an indication of the type of services available.

Comments

Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
yep. the old 'upto' trick. that must be the most useless statistic of all time and has been proved wrong so many times. the national average speed for the uk is 3.something.
and half the country can't even sustain 2 meg. So I disagree, it isn't an indication of anything like you say, its an indication of how much a country can get away with advertising.
Posted by rian over 7 years ago
Cyberdoyle, I do agree advertised speed is an indication of the type of services available. But the problem in UK is that the copper lines are tooo old and the actual speed is far far away from advertised speed. It's hard to blame the ISP in some situations as they can't do much on the line belongs to BT.
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
And in actual tested speeds...we're still ahead of countries like the US, and behind many other countries because BT dosn't refuse to provide broadband in situations where other countries ISP's would laugh.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 7 years ago
Quote"...average advertised download speeds show the UK 15th with 10.6Mbps"

God knows what position we would be without LLU companies and cable then.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
Hrm we're not ahead of the US at all. Speedtest.net measures the UK at 5.50Mbps and the USA at 7.30Mbps. It's also partly pre-qualification but also certainly partly to do with out relatively immature VDSL and FTTP deployments. But hey why take a balanced view when you can take one that suits your opinion even if it's obviously not factual.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
...Still I guess if we find a good and flattering UK result, which the speedtest.net one is I might add it being higher than the recent Ofcom results, and find a nice unflattering result somewhere for the rest of the world, we can probably bodge ourselves to a reasonable place. I have to admit though I've seen no study, ever, that has UK and USA both there and gives UK a higher downstream or upstream speed. I welcome correction.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
While I'm at it regarding BT's lack of refusal to provide service, this presumably means these people who are refused HSI service elsewhere aren't on dialup and would bring the average performance of their country down somewhat more heavily? One needs to do a broadband only survey.

A statistic that is relevant to measured speeds is http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/21/58/39574845.xlsIt should also be noted that the UK offers government support to get people to take broadband, which will help takeup.
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
Real measurements, Dixi, not self-selected and ones massively influenced by the available test servers, which differ wildly.

Why bother with reality when you can find "statistics" which suit your side of the story. I'm sure you're a climate change denier as well.

And dial-up users are *not* included in *broadband* statistics.

"It should also be noted that the UK offers government support..."

Oh? Where can I get the cash?
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
You evidently don't have kids Mr Falcon - my daughter had a newsletter telling us how to obtain govt assistance for a PC and broadband connection.

As far as 'reality' goes - if you'd care to provide something to back up *your* version of reality it'd be appreciated. I have no side and couldn't care less it's just that every side by side comparison I've ever seen, including those showing *all* connections not just broadband, puts the US out in front. What are 'real measurements'? Where do I find them? Give me a web link to read, you must have one with these real measurements somewhere?
Posted by comnut over 7 years ago
Quote"..we're not ahead of the US at all. Speedtest.net measures the UK at 5.50Mbps and the USA at 7.30Mbps"

Well unless you are ACTUALLY in the US, this is not a real figure, ass it includes any congestion on transatlantic cables, and then the big logjam in the UK... I always find speedtest sites that only have US servers are slower...

And yes, it was a US site talking about speeds, and how simple it was to get BB...
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
Comnut these stats come from www.speedtest.net which has servers all over the place so I'm not sure of the relevance of the above? I should perhaps have said 'measures the average connection'.
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
No I don't have kids. So, please, link me to where the deal is. It's a genuine question, because as far as I know there's no UK-wide policy for this.

And I'm not going back through this site's history, you know as well as I do the study I'm referring to.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
The statistic in this post is for 'advertised speeds' not actual recorded speeds, which are well under half of what is advertised. just sayin.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 7 years ago
quote"The statistic in this post is for 'advertised speeds' not actual recorded speeds, which are well under half of what is advertised. just sayin."

Completetly correct cyberdoyle :) hence my original comment. We wouldnt even have an average advertised speed of 10.6Mb if it wasnt for cable, LLU etc. Its quite shocking to think what our average advertised speed would be without them.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
No Dawn I don't know the study else I wouldn't have asked about it, if you're referring to Ofcom's performance testing it gives a lower number than speedtest. A Google of government free broadband will give you details on the broadband / PCs for low income families.
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
And? I made a point about relative numbers, not absolute ones.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
You missed my point which was that speedtests are derided as being inaccurately low yet the USA speeds are higher on there than the UK's on either the Ofcom survey, speedtest.net or Akamai surveys. Show me a link, any reputable link, that shows better measured UK performance and all good.

If you have one of course. You have made the claim a few times and never supplied any kind of evidence.

Trust you found the information on broadband and PC grants ok?
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
I'm referring to a study linked here *shrugs*

And I found a link to the old scheme, but as far as I knew that pool was exhausted, which is why I'm interested they're advertising it again.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
Humour me, which study? Vagueness seems rather pointless if it's so obvious. I've not seen anything that does a side-by-side of UK/USA where UK comes out on top.

That pool might be all done, here's the next 'version': http://www.homeaccess.org.uk/
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 7 years ago
The Ofcom data did not include any 50Meg results, and had very few people on faster than 10Meg connections.

Who cares about league tables, it is what your own connection does, that matters surely?
Posted by mishminx over 7 years ago
Well the BBC seems to think such things newsworthy.

"Only 10% of UK homes could connect at over 8 megabits (Mbps) a second, compared with 37% in the Netherlands.

People in Sweden and France also had much faster speeds than those in the UK.

It placed the UK 21st out of 30 countries in terms of network speeds."

Must be a new site policy, posting news and then telling us nobody cares about it. xD
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