Broadband News

BDUK releases Broadband Performance Indicator for superfast programme

The BDUK team running within DCMS has released its data for the period to the end of December 2016.

The pace of the BDUK roll-outs may have slackened somewhat as projects undertake reviews and a shift towards more fibre to the premises increases the amount of work needed to add more premises. This shift in technology potentially explains the drop in the number of premises passed per £1 million of money from Westminster, since a high in September 2014 plus the additional work involved with Exchange Only lines being upgraded and infill cabinets that are an increased feature of the projects now.

Cumulative to end of: Premises with superfast broadband service made available BDUK funding (£) Number of premises covered per £million of broadband delivery programme expenditure
December 2012 254 £434,735 584
March 2013 16,638 £6,767,185 2,459
June 2013 38,343 £6,767,185 5,666
September 2013 111,968 £10,347,568 10,821
December 2013 273,731 £14,182,547 19,301
March 2014 508,801 £58,586,408 8,685
June 2014 888,113 £72,437,233 12,260
September 2014 1,383,777 £99,766,011 13,870
December 2014 1,908,725 £252,084,918 7,572
March 2015 2,411,395 301,444,870 7,999
June 2015 2,905,764 £331,828,330 8,757
September 2015 3,311,843 £372,153,178 8,899
December 2015 3,625,369 £406,918,848 8,909
March 2016 3,840,643 £476,742,422 8,056
June 2016 4,021,047 £492,573,929 8,163
September 2016 4,168,739 £497,656,699 8,377
December 2016 4,309.668 £513,598.393 8,391

The premises figure does take into account the drop of in performance from VDSL2 as the length of the increases and thus includes only premises where speeds over 24 Mbps are to be expected.

Our own independent tracking reveals that at the end of January 2017 we recorded 4.1 million premises had gained access to a superfast broadband option via the project, which while lower than the official figure is explained by factors including fibre to the premises coverage where we are not differentiating between commercial and BDUK funded coverage currently and some 100 to 200 cabinets that are infill or EO upgrades and we are still determining their actual location. There are an additional 533,000 premises passed by VDSL2 but not getting superfast speeds in our data, and this may also explain some of the gap i.e. our adoption of a pessimistic crosstalk model (i.e. take-up running at 50% or more).

Comments

Do we know what comes after BDUK? Are there any other funding programmes? BDUK excluded London and a couple of other cities, and problems in superfast broadband availability are no longer a rural issue.

  • hvis42
  • 8 months ago

Plenty of commercial work going on in London, and even EO areas marked down for FTTP.

As for beyond BDUK, projects still have a couple of years left to run.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

Still seem to be lagging way behind in my part of Northern Ireland. Don`t see any plans for improving fixed line BB in my area for 2017.

  • pipcoo
  • 8 months ago

Still no sign of anything here is SW Scotland, no plan to address "too far from the cabinet"

  • brianhe
  • 8 months ago

Some small rural exchanges can now provide "Superfast broadband" but due to line length and EO lines there is only a small percentage of those subscribers at the exchange able to benefit if they want it (money well spent?)however it does makes the stats look good for FTTC.

  • 21again
  • 8 months ago

Some small rural exchanges can now provide "Superfast broadband" but due to line length and EO lines there is only a small percentage of those subscribers at the exchange able to benefit if they want it (money well spent?)however it does makes the stats look good for FTTC.

  • 21again
  • 8 months ago

Some small rural exchanges can now provide "Superfast broadband" but due to line length and EO lines there is only a small percentage of those subscribers at the exchange able to benefit if they want it (money well spent?)however it does makes the stats look good for FTTC.

  • 21again
  • 8 months ago

Unsure what you are talking about there. The stats specifically mention superfast availability. Nothing to do with exchanges or premises passed by FTTC cabinets. No >24 or 30Mb no influence on the numbers in the above table.

  • CarlThomas
  • 8 months ago

@Andrew How many BDUK cabinets have you counted to get the 4.1m + 533k? BDUK also exclude the overbuild of Virginmedia.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

@21again. Re: "however it does makes the stats look good for FTTC"
What part of "The premises figure does take into account the drop of in performance from VDSL2 as the length of the increases and thus includes only premises where speeds over 24 Mbps are to be expected." is unclear?

  • MCM999
  • 8 months ago

@ValueForMoney I have excluded Virgin Media overlap and as for cabinets, given the hardwork involved in figuring it all out not sure I'll give it to you for free.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

The article does mention the drop between superfast and VDSL2 and our data indicates this is around 13%. DCMS are taking this distance issue into account.

Want to see what this looks like then peek at https://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local/broadband-map#13/57.2707/-5.5054/openreach/

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

Hi Broadband Watchers
My observation of the above is DCMS is using the A clear line at 1000 M/ .6 mile at (24 Meg ) and TBB is measuring the B at 1000 m at (24) .6 mile so both are correct if looking from the customer / ISP. TBB measurements results are picking up the congestion plus the X talk and even the customers faults so there results will be lower when using the medium.

  • Blackmamba
  • 8 months ago

Fact highlight: Our coverage calculations do not pick up or use congestion, if they did the Virgin Media coverage levels would be fluctuating a lot.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

Andrew - I counted 28,000 subsidised cabinets to Dec2016 and 7,500 in progress. The premises attached to these 28k is over 6m which surprised me. I guess there is mix of spare plant and overbuild.
How reliable is the 533k?

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

Hi Value.
I think the 100 pair tie is only the section which is subsidised so it only covers 28k x 100 customers/ premises. The council only pays for the service at the out put of the tie pair so they are getting value for money. They even get money back via the clawback on the total take up.

  • Blackmamba
  • 8 months ago

No idea what is meant by spare plant, and I hope the six million is not the normal extrapolation

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

@Andrew - no it is cabinet by cabinet and associated premise count.
How was the 533k arrived at?

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

Simple, we have our system which you can see the public side of at http://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local/postcode-search and we distinguish between superfast and non superfast postcodes, and the maps on that site highlight them too.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

@Andrew -so do you start with 28m premise number you have referenced before, which is great but has it shortcomings beyond a certain point or do you use a OR working system size used in BT's regulated accounts?
Are you doing a bottom up build from BT wholesale systems, or top down statistical estimate to derive the 4.1m and 533k number? I think your doing the latter but I want to be clear. It is a bit fluffy rather than clear.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

Don't start with 28m, we started with zero and have worked to build the model from that point.

No idea what the Working System size in the BT accounts is, guessing its just a single figure, and clearly would not work where they don't have a network.

Fluffy because I personally feel no reason for explaining my method when the person asking seems to be fishing for methodology help.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

VfM has been quoting numbers for years yet is now asking about how to compile them...

Did I miss details of the court case?

  • Somerset
  • 8 months ago

@somerset @Andrew - seeking verification of TB methodology. Bottom up but not based on OR system size which is crucial in any rural calculation.
Not 28m is significant as this is what was used by Ofcom in their stylised costs for USO - poor effort I think.
On court cases -just look at the now £325m BT CD and how it will continue growing, but there are gaps to fill, and quantifying those gaps is important for those so far excluded. TBD constituency based data is really useful and serves as a proxy for the limitations of VDSL Cabinets in these constituencies.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

@somerset @Andrew Attempting to refine our understanding of the remaining challenge is a valid exercise when there is funding to do another 500k FTTP in rural if industry/bduk applies itself.
It would be useful to understand how 533k on top of 4.1m was estimated.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

Simple as I've said we have a system that covers availability of many providers, as evidenced by the link I posted and lots of work over a number of years means we are able to identify postcodes where superfast is and is not available.

http://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local/broadband-map#10/51.6001/-2.3332/openreach/ is a map that makes it obvious the extent of our model (tiles update monthly)

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

Very happy to engage with Gov, regulator and industry to discuss what we do but for random requests where no commercial confidentiality is in place we are vague, as we have found plenty of work over the years gets exploited with no commercial payback or even acknowledgement of the many years of hardwork it took to get there.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

@Andrew understood but questioning you on 533k is not random, it is a number you have quoted. It amounts 11.5% of BDUK homes passed. In very rural constituencies the distance issue can impact more than 50% of those attached to a cab and expecting an upgrade.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

The 533k is the number of premises we have tracked as part of a BDUK delivered cabinet who cannot get superfast speeds.

So what is your actual question? You think this is too low? Too high?

Fully aware the situation varies from cabinet to cabinet, and it is arrived by looking at the outcome for an individual postcode, rather than a generic 13% across the board.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

@Andrew
An example of a consultant wanting to borrow your watch to tell someone else the time? ;-)

  • New_Londoner
  • 8 months ago

Andrew; The 533k looks ok but trying to reconcile it to the 6.3m premises passing the 28,000 BT cabinets as of DEC 2016, compared to the 4.xm who can get superfast. That gap leaves a good deal of Virgin overbuild. These are not too difficult to spot.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

New_Londoner just trying to understand the timepiece being used. The opportunity for fibre in-fill activity is huge given the funding available, something you must be encouraged by.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

Timepiece?

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 months ago

Andrew - New_Londoner referenced borrowing your watch.

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

Andrew - If Ofcom requested a TB view of overbuild, could you reply?

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

@Mike
Why is overbuild important in this context? It's not as if it's funded by the BDUK programme so why does it matter? And why wouldn't Ofcom ask the BDUK team if it felt the need to have this information about the BDUK programme?

  • New_Londoner
  • 8 months ago

BDUK pay all the bills and then some tapering of BT funds occurs perhaps, so the deductions for overbuild and the amount of overbuild will need to be transparent at some point, given there are still gaps to fill.
If Gov are expecting others to pay for the BUSO then the use of existing monies needs to be explained more completely.
So it is not just overbuild but the triggers for gap funding will need exposing so the BUSO fund costs are minimised. That's a prediction.
How much have the overbuild deductions been so far?

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

New_Londoner perhaps you can give an example. If costs of say £15k and only 1 from 200 premises are outside the Virginmedia footprint! How does this work? How is it recorded?

  • ValueforMoney
  • 8 months ago

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