Broadband News

EE launches full fibre services

The complaints about a lack of retail options for Openreach FTTP should decrease today as EE is the latest broadband provider to start selling the services, with 40/10, 80/20, 160/30, 300/50 and 900/110 Mbps (download/upload) packages available.

The pricing is the same as the identical G.fast or VDSL2 service and follows the EE trend of offering the service without a landline. For many who make no use of their existing phone line this is perfectly reasonable and is perhaps a pound or two a month cheaper. For the G.fast and VDSL2 EE products there is the option to add a phone service but this adds at least £8/m, there is no option to add a landline to the FTTP services.

Pricing is valid until 1st or 2nd October - EE communication sees to vary between those two dates. Minimum contract term is 18 months and a £25 setup fee applies.

The lack of a landline on the FTTP services means if you do want to retain the landline number you need to do a port with renumber of the existing number onto a VoIP service as migrating or upgrading with EE will otherwise see the telephone number ceased and thrown back into the general pool.

The strict no landline with FTTP may mean some people shy away from EE, but as EE is part of the BT Group there is the option of BT Consumer who still offer FTTP/landline packages.

Comments

What happens in a situation where you already have slower FTTC broadband at around max ~35mpbs but you now have the choice of FTTP and want to change provider to EE for ~70mbps FTTP? How do you guarantee that the new service or existing service migration is provisioned on FTTP rather than using the existing FTTC?

Or do new orders & migrations automatically get FTTP once it's available and the gaining ISP supports it?

  • MaryHinge
  • 26 days ago

If your FTTC is a max of 35 Mbps then no point in provisioning the FTTC 80/20 version, so most likely that the 80/20 would be FTTP based.

In terms of guarantee would rely on the ISP and the consumer also checking what the ISP has ordered.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 26 days ago

Could some please explane why Openreach FTTP is Asymmetric (900 Download/110 Upload) an not Symmetric (900 Download/900 Upload). Correct me if wrong but isn't FTTP fibre to proprietary. What make this fibre Asymmetric?

So what is the technical issue with that makes Openreach FTTP Asymmetric then?
Or is just Symmetric technology being downgraded to work as Asymmetric?

  • amiga_dude
  • 26 days ago

@amiga_dude - google for gpon and you'll see the technology used to deliver which in this case is asymmetric.

  • ian72
  • 26 days ago

"What make this fibre Asymmetric?"

Because your average Jo Public doesn't need symmetric speeds on FTTP. Users who really do require symmetric speeds (typically businesses) will often go for leased line FTTP where you not only get symmetric speeds but a better SLA as well.

  • baby_frogmella
  • 26 days ago

So unless other websites are incorrect Cityfibre uses GPON.
Vodafone (cityfiber) 900 Download/900 Upload to the public. That looks like using GPON can be configered to be Symmetric.

  • amiga_dude
  • 26 days ago

GPON can be configured to be symmetric, but if you have 32 to 128 people sharing 2.5 Gbps down and 1.2 Gbps upload and thus one person heavily using 1 Gbps symmetric could cause issues particularly on the upstream side.

XGPON and other variants some providers are already deploying has higher bandwidths available and the physical fibre being installed can handle this, just needs the laser creating the light at each end to be upgraded.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 26 days ago

This is little old (2 years if call that old) but it shows GPON is set 1:32, also states 1000Mb/s symmetric

https://www.cityfibre.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/CF-Fact-Sheet_FTTH-Consumer-FTTH_Jan-2018.pdf

  • amiga_dude
  • 26 days ago

Cityfibre indeed offer up to 1000/1000 symmetric to end user. Up to 32 people are sharing a single GPON port, which means they are sharing 2.4G down, 1.2G up. It's a highly contended service, especially in the upstream direction. To achieve an acceptable level of service they are banking on not many people using the upstream heavily at the same time.

Openreach contend their downstream as much as Cityfibre, but the upstream far less so.

In the end it's a business decision. Openreach decided to make people who want a faster upstream pay more.

  • candlerb
  • 26 days ago

£40 for 145 Mbps download, 30 Mbps upload speed, not too bad I suppose considering how much we used to pay for a lot lower speed and how much some people pay for FTTC.

I don't think I would bother even if I had the choice.

  • zyborg47
  • 25 days ago

We got offered really good deal to switch with fttp.. this with with bt not ee mind you..

Deal was called full fibre 900 halo

for £34 per month so accepted this

  • jamie001
  • 25 days ago

@jamie001, interesting deal on Full Fiber 900 for £34. Can you share how you negotiated that or how that came about?

  • Jason_P
  • 25 days ago

Just logged onto EE and got a quote. Very misleading. They state I can have fibre - but dont make clear that it is only FTTC - same as I have already. In fact I can imagine many will think they are about to get FTTP as its just not clear!!

  • alanbc
  • 24 days ago

Not misleading at all according to the ASA, And Mr Justice Murray who accepted that "full-fibre infrastructure is technically superior to part-fibre technology", but added that the ASA was right to say average consumers don't understand that.

"consumers neither know nor care about the practical difference between part-fibre and full-fibre broadband"

It was BS then and its still BS, Shame on you Mr Murray and the ASA.

  • Swac3
  • 23 days ago

"consumers neither know nor care about the practical difference between part-fibre and full-fibre broadband"

That's totally true because the general public - ie not regular ThinkBroadband visitors - buy broadband on speeds offered & cost, not on the technology used to deliver the service. The average Jo Public couldn't give 2 hoots if their service is called 'bog standard ADSLMax' or 'Super Duper Hyperfast FTTP' just as long as they're getting the speeds they were told they would be getting at signup.

  • baby_frogmella
  • 23 days ago

Just googled EE and got this page https://broadband.ee.co.uk/offers?product_id=AF18NC which has Fibre Max 145 and 300 "with landline". Is that out of date?

  • pvfpvf
  • 23 days ago

That page looks out of date, if you follow through with details you end up seeing without landline pricing

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 23 days ago

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