Broadband News

Openreach publishes wholesale pricing for 0.5 Gbps and Gigabit full fibre services

  • Wednesday, September 18, 2019 2:38 PM
  • 6 comments

We covered the last set of Openreach FTTP price proposals in July and at that time the 550 Mbps and 1000 Mbps service pricing was left as POA, but now the official price list site has updated to reveal the data product pricing.

CAUTION: These prices cover just the local access Openreach network, wholesalers and retailers will need to add their costs for picking the data up from a handover exchange and getting this data to the wider Internet, as well as the usual service costs such as billing and some profit.

Data only FTTP product
All prices are monthly and exclude VAT
Current Price Price% change
40 Mbps / 10 Mbps in FTTC notspots (regulated) £12.28 £12.28 0%
40 Mbps / 10 Mbps in FTTC areas £15.79 £14.28 -10%
55 Mbps / 10 Mbps £16.79 £16.79 0%
80 Mbps / 20 Mbps £18.34 £17.28 -6%
110 Mbps / 15 Mbps £21.54 £17.28 -20%
160 Mbps / 30 Mbps £21.14 £21.14 0%
220 Mbps / 20 Mbps £24 £21.28 -11%
220 Mbps / 30 Mbps £21.28 New for March 2020
330 Mbps / 50 Mbps £38 £24.28 -36%
550 Mbps / 75 Mbps   £27.28 New for March 2020
1000 Mbps / 115 Mbps   £31.28 New for March 2020

The install fee on the 550/75 and 1000/115 products remain the same as the slower FTTP services i.e. £97.03 + VAT.

We are also expecting a low bandwidth FTTP product to fit into the WLR switch off/migration plans, but cannot spot any pricing on this, though expecting the same sort of pricing as copper MPF line rental. The idea being that the copper line can be replaced by this FTTP product in scenarios where people do not want broadband but just a telephone service.

The question now is who much will the additional costs be and while traditionally the price point for broadband has been driven by competition between the largest four UK broadband providers the growth of aggressively priced alternate FTTP operators may be the force driving the price down. The question is how much slow down at peak time will the public accept on a Gigabit product when the adverts claim 900 Mbps average speeds at peak times, or put another full fibre guarantees connection speed but guaranteeing throughput especially at speeds of several hundred Mega bits per second comes with a cost.

Comments

Great news! This means there’s a good chance that mass providers such as BT Retail, Sky, TalkTalk et al will start selling the high end services sometime next year. Though I can’t imagine many smaller CPs selling them due to the high bandwidth costs especially if on BT Wholesale tails.

  • baby_frogmella
  • about 1 month ago

Looks like a deathnail for the 160/30 tier. Who is going to take that when 220/30 is 14 pence more expensive. I would imagine the 220/20 tier will go too, given its the smae price as 220/30.

  • jabuzzard
  • about 1 month ago

@jabuzzard, that makes sense.

Current FTTC offerings, are 40/10, or double that at 80/20.

As you've said, this update renders the 160/30 and 220/20 services pointless, which most ISP's wont bother selling...

This leaves you with a nice: 110/15, or double that at 220/30.

  • hsncool
  • about 1 month ago

Why are we still working with asymmetric speeds with a technology that is symmetric? Seems to just be taking account of customer confusion between FTTC and FTTP. AFAIK other countries have generally gone full symmetric. Even if an ISP wants to offer a symmetric connection, they can't.

  • indigomm
  • 27 days ago

“The idea being that the copper line can be replaced by this FTTP product in scenarios where people do not want broadband but just a telephone service.”

Shouldn’t this be the other way round, or am I missing something?

  • milesm
  • 27 days ago

@indigomm

"Why are we still working with asymmetric speeds with a technology that is symmetric?"

I'm guessing for business reasons, e.g. you'll pay extra for a business account with symetric upload (though probably equivalent or even slower download).

  • zntrx
  • 26 days ago

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