Broadband News

Full fibre from Openreach and how much was gap funded in the last month.

Openreach is aiming to reach 30,000 premises every week with its FTTP roll-outs but for now the pace is firmly stuck at around the 20,000 premises mark. If the focus is just on a 100% UK wide target driven by the UK Government then the where does not matter, but with lots of public money still going into gap funded roll-outs we feel its important to see how much is being built and thus contributing to the superfast goals.

Splits for Openreach FTTP and change in category since 12th August 2019:

  • 463,381 premises via BDUK or other rural intervention (increase of 10,385)
  • 634,645 premises in Fibre First areas (increase of 48,142)
  • 240,990 premises via New Build since January 2016 (increase of 16,229)
  • 154,915 premises via commercial/old roll-out (increase of 5,616)

To avoid you all getting your calculators out the total is 1,493,931 premises where Openreach FTTP is available to order. 

The new build figure was higher this month as on 8th September we started to integrate the latest release of postcodes from ONS and figuring out what broadband services are available.

The stand out figure is that the amount of gap funded FTTP showed an increase of 10,385 premises, previous month this increase was 7,448 premises and prior to that 7,379 and 7,010. This suggests that August looks to have been a prime go live month for rural FTTP but we would caveat that by pointing out that we did spend a lot more time searching in rural areas for changes in broadband options. An observation we can make is that in most areas the FTTP build is going to those with speeds below 10 Mbps (via existing VDSL2 or ADSL2+) but there are some interesting ones where the FTTP build does extend into parts of cabinet footprint where superfast speeds were expected from VDSL2.

For those wondering about the increase in the old roll-out/commercial figure this includes exchanges such as Failsworth and Hunslet where FTTP has been built overlaying the VDSL2 network but the exchanges are not on the Fibre First lists.

Comments

"FTTP build is going to those with speeds below 10 Mbps (via existing VDSL2 or ADSL2+) but there are some interesting ones where the FTTP build does extend into parts of cabinet footprint where superfast speeds were expected from VDSL2."

We have two examples of this on the Minster Ramsgate exchange - one area has 2mb ADSL being upgraded to full fibre, and another area (around CT7 0HG - Woodchurch Manston) that appears to have 20-40mbps FTTC being upgraded to full fibre. I can't see any reason for this area to be getting FTTP to be honest (no new builds, or a slow area)!

  • SlimJ
  • about 1 month ago

CT7 0HG is more like 17 Mbps VDSL2 on our data, and 10 to 25 Mbps range from Openreach on a quick look.

CT12 4JQ and CT12 5DT look like prime candidates for FTTP from quick look at a map

One difficulty is if a phase extension/contract is to deliver x,000 premises but there is 10 times that many premises that could benefit then who misses out?

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • about 1 month ago

Thanks Andrew. I guess you have more information than what appears on DSLChecker! :) This postcode shows similar results to what I see for my postcode and I generally see more than this estimate.

CT12 4JQ - This is very near the cabinet I'm served from, but they're connected to a cabinet miles away!

CT12 5DT - I agree, that area is quite a distance from the cabinet, so would assume this would be upgraded to FTTP in the not too distant future.

  • SlimJ
  • about 1 month ago

We have our own database that drives the outputs to https://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • about 1 month ago

Thank you. Useful to see. The new BDUK report showed an overall VDSL2/FTTP of 18K a month since the last report. It will be a very long time before LFFN can come close to 10k a month.

  • ValueforMoney
  • about 1 month ago

LFFN is never going to do 10k a month, because the stimulus it is meant to generate over the years is commercial roll-out.

You could infer that the 500 homes near the a council building enabled via LFFN would never have seen full fibre any other way, but its just inferring. Also LFFN is not about getting people into superfast its often going to be superfast going to full fibre, so different again from BDUK goals.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • about 1 month ago

I can only see a very small market for G.Fast at this moment in time, and by the time it might be needed in future I would guess most will be on FTTP anyway.

  • burble
  • about 1 month ago

Whoops wrong story, how did that happen?

  • burble
  • about 1 month ago

Post a comment

Login Register