Broadband News

5G for the home is here at £35/m for unlimited data

The competition for broadband in London just got a bit more crowded as the three 5G is now live and the first service to lauch is the Three Home Broadband with truly unlimited data and advertised average speeds of 100 Mbps at just £35/m on a 12 month contract.

Three’s 5G is going to revolutionise the home broadband experience. No more paying for landline rental, no more waiting for engineers, and even a same day delivery option. It really is the straightforward plug and play broadband that customers have been waiting for.

We’ve taken a simple approach with one single truly unlimited data plan to give customers the opportunity to fully explore 5G and all its exciting possibilities. The ease and immediacy of it all means home broadband using 5G is going to be key to the future of the connected home.

Dave Dyson, CEO at Three

One advantage of the three 5G service with its Wi-Fi/ethernet router is that delivery is fast, for £20 you can have it delivered the same day or opt for the free next day delivery.

While advertised as average 100 Mbps speeds we are waiting to see what speeds people actually get from the service as there is potential for breaking the Gigabit barrier as three has over 100 MHz of 5G spectrum available which means higher speeds for individuals and slowdowns due to congestion of the radio spectrum should be a lot less.

A London launch may seem limited but expansion to another 25 towns and cities is expected by the end of 2019.

While Three customers already use 3.5 times the amount of mobile data compared to the industry average of 2.9 GB this is still a long way behind the average for fixed line broadband usage of 240 GB (Ofcom Connected Nations 2018 figures) so it will be interesting to see how the new 5G service handles this. The experience gained from the years of running Relish means Three should be well aware of the difference and the effect of boxset binges and the impact of big data events such as game launches.

Comments

Odd they don't do the 24-month contract with this. It might have brought the headline figure down to £25/month or so.

  • richi
  • about 1 month ago

Pricing of course is never set in stone, so it may change, but if going head to head with your standard fixed line services a 24 month contract is a lot longer than what people see advertised usually.

Keeping it simple for the initial launch is also another factor.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • about 1 month ago

I really wish some of the other main providers did Unlimited (or genuine high-usage) packages for replacement of fixed line. I am in a Three and Vodaphone not-spot so am stuck with choosing between O2 and EE who do not offer packages of, say, 150-200Gb/month.

  • DanielCoffey
  • about 1 month ago

I'm just waiting to see whether Three's 5G can beat altnet FTTP to reach rural areas - I know the best case in my area is Gigaclear in 2 years or so, but can Three improve on the 5MHz 4G channel on band 20 before then?

  • sheephouse
  • about 1 month ago

A lot will depend on not just the band size but the frequency, since if the 5 MHz of 4G is at a lower frequency than the larger 5G band then it may be the case that the 5G service will not reach you.

Rural 5G is more likely to be 700 MHz based and not see the 100 Mbps speeds talked about today

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • about 1 month ago

At £35 a month they can stick it, i pay too much as it is for broadband.
Anyway, 5G still have issues and to be honest I really do not want one of those masts close by me.

  • zyborg47
  • about 1 month ago

Just had a look and they do 4G as well at £22 a month, that is not too bad, cheaper than what I paying and i know 4G here is faster than my FTTC, well it is on EE network anyway. 3 can be a bit iffy here.

i feel the unlimited is a bit iffy, i bet there will use some sort of traffic management.

  • zyborg47
  • about 1 month ago

According to everything I've read (people asking Three about it) all their current packages support 5G once available in your area.

  • alexatkinuk
  • about 1 month ago

@DanielCoffey
Not sure about O2 but last time I checked EE did offer packages of up to 200GB/month for broadband replacement. It’s worth getting with an external aerial (which I think cost £100) to give the best possible signal reception.

  • New_Londoner
  • about 1 month ago

^^^^
I just checked, packages on EE now run up to 500MB/month, so clearly things have moved on.

  • New_Londoner
  • about 1 month ago

I assume you mean 500Gb - I can't see any such offer on their SIM-only pages.

  • DanielCoffey
  • about 1 month ago

@DanielCoffey
Definitely 500GB (giga Bytes) per month, 500gb (gigs bits) would not be so useful! :)

Try this link to find the list of packages:

https://shop.ee.co.uk/dongles/pay-monthly-mobile-broadband/4gee-router/details#choosePlanAnchor

  • New_Londoner
  • about 1 month ago

Well spotted, thanks! I didn't see them because I would be using my own external antenna and modem so only looked at the SIM-only deals.

  • DanielCoffey
  • about 1 month ago

I've had over 150mb on EE 4g on my S8+, vs the max 50mb I can get on FTTC (despite actually syncing at 62mb), have moved since but still get 90mb. Hoping Three 5g reaches here soon, no idea what their 4g is like here but I don't think 5g reaches this far yet (outskirts of north london). Not gone with 4g for home broadband due to the latency, it can be ok (15ms) but it can also be very iffy and I saw one speed test on 5g showing a 9ms ping which matches what I get on my FTTC. If I can get that kinda ping, stable, and a significantly better speed than 50mb I would ditch the landline in a flash.

  • ewok
  • 29 days ago

Hmm I currently have a 3 Mobile phone contract but the signal is Bad ( as I live in a ground floor flat they also had to supply a signal booster which connects to my Home Broadband
So why would I want 3 5G service
is it any better penetrating concrete!!?

  • 1Gopher
  • 28 days ago

How is this for latency/gaming?

Also, for some it might be plug and play, but if you're geared up with your network gear in the centre of your house/under stairs/similar, you might have to do some antenna work/mount it in the loft and run cables to get a decent signal, no?

  • Cessquill
  • 24 days ago

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