Broadband News

Trump and Mozilla nominated as Internet Villains

Nominations for the Internet Hero and Internet Villain categories in the ISPA Awards are made by a public poll each year and ISPA has released the list of nominations for the 2019 event.

ISPA Internet Hero

  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee – for spearheading the ‘Contract for the Web’ campaign to rebuild trust and protect the open and free nature of the Internet in the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web
  • Andrew Ferguson OBE, Editor, thinkbroadband - for providing independent analysis and valuable data on the UK broadband market since the year 2000
  • Oscar Tapp-Scotting & Paul Blaker, Global Internet Governance Team, DCMS – for leading the UK Government’s efforts to ensure a balanced and proportionate agenda at the International Telecommunications Union Conference

ISPA Internet Villain

  • Mozilla – for their proposed approach to introduce DNS-over-HTTPS in such a way as to bypass UK filtering obligations and parental controls, undermining internet safety standards in the UK
  • Article 13 Copyright Directive – for threatening freedom of expression online by requiring ‘content recognition technologies’ across platforms
  • President Donald Trump – for causing a huge amount of uncertainty across the complex, global telecommunications supply chain in the course of trying to protect national security

The winners are chosen by the ISPA Council, with the awards in the other categories having already been decided by a judging panel some weeks ago. Winners will find out on the evening of 11th July at the gala event in London.

Comments

"Mozilla – for their proposed approach to introduce DNS-over-HTTPS in such a way as to bypass UK filtering obligations and parental controls, undermining internet safety standards in the UK"

I don't have the words for how stupid this nomination is. SO because some parents are too feckless to use porn blockers on their kids access we should all be exposed to man-in-the-middle attacks and the like. Genius.

Might as well add all the browsers to this nomination as they are all going to or already have DNS-over-HTTPS in testing.

  • Croft12
  • 4 months ago

If the browser supplier was to offer parental controls via its DNS that would probably solve a lot of the concerns.

There is a danger if browser suppliers stick their heads in the sand that what are guidelines become much stricter laws e.g. some new law that all DNS resolutions are mandated as being via Government approved services for those in the UK.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 4 months ago

While I recognise that danger is perhaps valid - Gov never cease to amaze with new technically illiterate solutions - but i'm not sure such a mandate is technically workable any more than bans/controls on VPNs

  • Croft12
  • 4 months ago

If that nomination is for you Andrew, then congratulations Sir.

We have one villain nom for threatening - and one for upholding - freedom of expression.

  • Cessquill
  • 4 months ago

To provide some balance to other comments already posted, it’s great to see Mozilla put forward in the villain category. By pushing DoH and threatening to implement it by default it potentially bypasses both parental controls and malware protection.

In return DoH threatens to provide US tech companies with yet another way to monetise our data, in this case our browser history. And it makes it harder to detect malware. Apart from that this is a well thought through protocol!

Contd

  • New_Londoner
  • 4 months ago

What a surprise that not all developments encouraged by US browser companies including Mozilla have our best interests at their heart. Perhaps this award might remind it to consider its users more and take less of a steer from Google, its major funder.

  • New_Londoner
  • 4 months ago

@Andrew
“If the browser supplier was to offer parental controls via its DNS that would probably solve a lot of the concerns.”

The problem there is that, by sharing such settings with the browser companies they learn a lot more about you. I’m not sure I’d want to gift such information to Google or Mozilla as it’s more for them to monetise.

DoH also puts new malware vulnerabilities on your device and makes it hard to spot malware C&C activity. But the big issue is Mozilla threatening to enable it by default, irrespective of the consequences for users.

  • New_Londoner
  • 4 months ago

The flip side being it stops your ISP knowing more about you.

So question is who do we trust for DNS resolution and if we don't want people monetising free browsers what is the alternative?

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 4 months ago

@Andrew
My ISP is constrained by U.K. and EU privacy regs which the US browser companies are trying to circumvent. Their alternative DNS offerings are covered by US law which offers no protection to non-US citizens.

As people are increasingly finding out, free services such as free DNS are rarely in fact free.

  • New_Londoner
  • 4 months ago

How about a community run DNS without logs?

  • Wilsonfromdevon
  • 3 months ago

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