Broadband News

Zzoomm to roll-out 10 Gbps full fibre services

Building new infrastructure is always a balancing game between how much future proofing to build in and the new full fibre provider Zzoomm is aiming for infrastructure that should not need upgrades in the local loop for many years with a XGS-PON roll-out delivering 10 Gbps full fibre to the premises.

This is all about future proofing - 10 years ago, one Gigabit was considered sufficient to meet future speed needs but this is no longer the case.

Working with ADTRAN, we are building out a robust infrastructure that’s fit for the coming decades. Zzoomm will deliver 10 Gigabit speeds to homes and businesses – both downloads and uploads - in towns and suburbs, some 400 to 500 times* faster than the average speeds across copper infrastructure.

We are targeting hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses that are still hampered by ageing copper infrastructure. They will no longer be hamstrung by dated communications networks with Zzoomm’s new full fibre network.

Matthew Hare, Chief Executive, Zzoomm

10 Gbps is beyond the capabilities of most consumer grade computers and with no product pricing we don't know yet what price you will have to pay to get the top speeds or what slower speed tiers will be available, but if this means that 10 Gbps capable CPE are deployed from day 1 it means people will be ready for whatever bandwidth eating applications arrive in the next couple of decades.

Deploying 10 Gbps PON is also going to require serious investment in capacity in the capacity of the regional interconnects and links to the rest of the Internet.

As no doubt someone will ask in the comments, the 'to 500 times* faster than the average speeds across copper infrastructure' figure is based on the median download speed of services across the Openreach local loop as we recorded in Q4 2018 which was 20.2 Mbps.

The biggest question that people will want to know now is where and when will the service be rolled out.

Comments

If this is GPON, then a single fibre is shared amongst x number of users. Without knowing how many they split up to, the 10Gbps number is meaningless surely? If that fibre is split amongst a typical 32 customers, then that's a guaranteed bandwidth of around 310Mbps each, which puts a different slant on it. Yes if only one customer is using their connection out of that 32, then they could allow 10Gbps speeds sometimes. Seems like a case of PR over reality. What's new.

  • philipd
  • 2 months ago

The level of PON split - remember they are talking about XGS PON rather than G PON is a global thing

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 2 months ago

Yes XGS-PON, which allows for symmetrical 10/10Gbps, but it is still a single fibre that is shared/split between n number of users. Yes it can be installed as point-to-point without splitting, but that would be a very expensive way of supplying FTTP. By the time we might need 10Gbps Internet connections <something>PON would need be running at terrabit speeds to supply enough bandwidth without too much contention to all the users hanging on the end.

They are using XGS-PON to allow a single fibre to be split more to reduce install costs, this news from them is PR only.

  • philipd
  • 2 months ago

How are things in other countries with masses more FTTP where a good number are also selling Gigabit services over GPON managing?

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 2 months ago

We are not talking about 1Gbps services though, the PR was for 10Gbps. Take a fibre running at 10Gbps split between 20 properties gives a guaranteed bandwidth for each customer of 500Mbps, so selling a 1Gbps service is pretty achievable as we know not all those 20 properties will max out their connection at the same time. Different story offering 10Gbps when that's all you've got and it needs sharing between 20 or so properties.

It's PR nonesense, plain and simple, why were sent the news article, and not only place it was sent?

  • philipd
  • 2 months ago

Aware talking 10 Gbps, but the splitting thing is common across the globe already, i.e. 1 Gbps service sold on a shared 2.5 Gbps GPON.

So was just trying to point out that single fibre services that are shared are far from uncommon.

Even in point to point (single fibre per customer) there will be a point where bandwidth joins others and is shared. Just a decision to be made over where that happens, and size of the fibre cables you are using.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 2 months ago

I think I was trying to say this was a PR article by Zzoom, some other news sites pointed this out. You can't offer a 10Gbps service over a 10Gbps PON fibre as technically you are selling something that can't realistically be achieved when it's shared.

I think most 1Gbps services are over 10Gbps PON. BT Openreach sell a 1Gbps service on their FTTP offering, but this has a one off extra fee as an insurance policy against the requirement to update their PON head-end to 10Gbps should the fibre be subscribed to other active users.

  • philipd
  • 2 months ago

It seems as if the formal connection speed for FTTP will become increasingly meaningless - it's no longer the bottleneck.

  • Chipmunk77
  • 2 months ago

When a company says they can offer something, when its something they have no intention on selling anytime soon its just vapour-wear, ITS PR, plain and simple.

  • philipd
  • 2 months ago

@Chipmunk77 "It seems as if the formal connection speed for FTTP will become increasingly meaningless - it's no longer the bottleneck."

FTTP using PON is likely to always be a possible bottleneck. For example, BTs FTTP a single fibre can be shared between 32 properties, if all properties are actively online, its 2500Mbps/32=78Mbps top speed. BT guarantee only 100Mbps on it's FTTP offerings due to the potential bottleneck here. Of course there are always bottlenecks for the low prices we pay as consumers compared to businesses. FTTP fibre from our homes is contended from the very start.

  • philipd
  • 2 months ago

Almost everything these days is a press release to some extent, was not away of any rule requiring us to state that as a result of receiving a press release we have used a quote and said some other words.

If their intent is to build a XGS-PON 10 Gbps network then what is the problem? Beyond a personal belief of some that this will NEVER happen.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 2 months ago

Have you ever worked in, or alongside, anyone running capacity planning on a broadband network, philipd?

The point regarding offering 10G over XGS-PON is well noted. It is actually something that's done in other places, however 'up to' is acceptable there while here the slightest twitch of performance and people are complaining to Trading Standards, the ASA, their MP, Ofcom, Jesus, God, Allah, Yahweh, etc.

  • CarlThomas
  • 2 months ago

@philipd - what might these 32 properties all be doing at the same time?

  • Somerset
  • 2 months ago

CDWM-PON is the way forward, the advantages of PtP with reduced fibre count.

  • jabuzzard
  • 2 months ago

@Somerset
Watching the Olympics/World Cup/Boat Race/Wimbledon etc.?

Though I agree that philipd's argument, although technically true, is somewhat moot.

  • uniquename
  • 2 months ago

@uniquename
You don’t need a 10Gbps connection to watch tv online. A 40/10 or 80/20 FTTC connection would be enough for most households.

  • baby_frogmella
  • 2 months ago

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