Broadband News

Over half of new premises in 2018 available with full fibre broadband

Our last summary of the situation for new homes in the UK with regards to broadband availability was published back in August and was timed as a summary just ahead of the release of the next set of postcode data from ONS, we have now had time to work through the new postcodes and add them to our availability checkers and thus can share what have learnt about the broadband availability for those postcodes marked as starting in May, June and July and others previously created but only just now being used.

The biggest change has been the full fibre (FTTP) situation, in August we reported that full fibre in new builds was running at 47.18% and things have no improved so that full fibre is available in 54.78% of new build premises.

The situation in terms of superfast broadband or not has also improved rising from 81.4% to 84.9% if you use the over 24 Mbps definition for superfast broadband, but as our table has shrunk to show the better 30 Mbps and faster definition that change with that definition is from 80.9% to 84.9%. Clearly more work still to be done, but the trend is positive.

thinkbroadband analysis of Superfast, USC, USO and Full Fibre Broadband Coverage across the UK, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland and English regions for new build premises - figures 12th October 2018
Area% fibre based
VDSL2 or
FTTP or
Cable
% superfast
30 Mbps or faster
% Ultrafast
100 Mbps or faster
FTTP,cable,G.fast
%
Full Fibre
and
Openreach FTTP
% Openreach and another FTTP in same location% Under 2 Mbps download% Below USO
10 Mbps download
1 Mbps upload
Includes ADSL2+
UK 2018
78,243 premises
86.7% 84.6% 57.1% 54.78%
49.71%
4.48% 0.6% 14.2%
UK 2017
145,088 premises
88.5% 86.9% 43.9% 38.40%
29.38%
5.20% 0.4% 12.2%
UK 2016
171,783 premises
89% 87.7% 38% 29.97%
18.98%
3.54% 0.3% 11.4
East of England 2018
7,014 premises
91.7% 88.9% 59.1% 56.94%
51.47%
0.29% 1.8% 10.4%
East of England 2017
12,117 premises
92% 89.3% 41.4% 34.83%
24.08%
0% 0.5% 9.5%
East Midlands 2018
2,465 premises
86.2% 84% 49.1% 47.33%
45.46%
0% 0.2% 15.2%
East Midlands 2017
3,719 premises
87% 85.2% 37.6% 23.30%
18.84%
0% 0.7% 13.7%
London 2018
15,194 premises
87.4% 86.6% 67.9% 63.93%
53.88%
21.15% 0.1% 12.7%
London 2017
28,197 premises
93.9% 93.5% 65.5% 61.12%
43.97%
22.09% 0.2% 6.3%
North East 2018
3,349 premises
71.7% 69.3% 43.5% 42.46%
41.83%
0.36% 0% 25.1%
North East 2017
5,930 premises
70.4% 69.2% 23.5% 19.49%
12.65%
0.2% 0% 29.6%
North West 2018
7,407 premises
85.5% 82.7% 46.9% 45.55%
45.55%
0.34% 1.1% 16.1%
North West 2017
16,621 premises
91.1% 89.4% 34.6% 28.39%
21.60%
1.94% 0.3% 9.6%
Northern Ireland 2018
903 premises
99.3% 84.3% 45.2% 44.85%
44.85%
0% 4.1% 7.4%
Northern Ireland 2017
2,081 premises
97% 86.1% 29% 21.34%
20.13%
0% 3.5% 7.7%
Scotland 2018
6,847 premises
84.2% 81.6% 62.4% 58.35%
57.43%
0.47% 0.7% 17%
Scotland 2017
11,530 premises
91% 88.6% 40.49% 35.34%
33.95%
0% 0.4% 9.7%
South East 2018
8,220 premises
92% 90.7% 63% 62.18%
52.42%
1.48% 0.2% 8.2%
South East 2017
13,938 premises
91% 89.9% 48.1% 42.07%
30.74%
2.3% 0.3% 9.4%
South West 2018
9,563 premises
88.2% 86% 55.9% 54.40%
47.98%
0% 0.4% 12.7%
South West 2017
18,635 premises
88.2% 86.8% 43.5% 39.47%
29.47%
0.28% 0.4% 12.4%
Wales 2018
2,919 premises
90.8% 89.2% 66.4% 59.95%
59.92%
0% 0.5% 9.8%
Wales 2017
3,195 premises
87.8% 86.7% 40.2% 36.49%
36.49%
0% 0% 12.2%
West Midlands 2018
8,157 premises
84.6% 82.9% 50.7% 49.18%
44.84%
0.67% 0.6% 16%
West Midlands 2017
17,717 premises
81.8% 80.6% 37.5% 30.64%
24.91%
1.57% 0.6% 18.9%
Yorkshire and Humber 2018
6,741 premises
81.3% 79.1% 45.5% 44.03%
41.61%
0.37% 0.5% 19.7%
Yorkshire and Humber 2017
11,655 premises
81.1% 79.1% 32.3% 27.82%
22.55%
2.83% 0.2% 19.2%

We need to highlight that the 2017 and to a smaller extent the 2016 figures are not at all static, this is because as we work from the date of introduction for a postcode it is possible that a postcode was assigned in Oct 2017 but premises only built in July 2018, an additional factor that will change the broadband coverage figures is that services such as VDSL2 can appear a year later. Another reason for later changes is that pressure on developers by those buying homes may see better broadband appear, certainly there has been a handful of area with VDSL2 that now have Openreach native FTTP available.

The full fibre picture is still led by London and the interesting statistic there is the large overlap between Openreach and other full fibre providers and this is an effect of the competition to deliver in London.

The region based summary is just the tip of the data we hold, we also have this data down to the local authority level and back to 2012. The local authority with the most premises appearing in 2018 so far is Hampshire County and 54.15% of the 2,785 2018 premises have the joy of a full fibre broadband option, looking back over the years 2017 49.56%, 2016 31.15%, 2015 25.45%, 2014 28.25%, 2013 26.53% and 2012 29.48%.

If our postcode checker is not recognising you then why not run a speed test and if the postcode has already been released by ONS we should spot you, or alternatively drop us an email. For those in very new postcodes where GPS and other services have trouble finding you then it is likely we won't spot you until the next data drop from ONS due at the start of December when we will filter the speed tests from the last few months to spot the unusual and get them added to our systems first.

Comments

Fibre overlay. Should never be allowed to happen. Anyone laying FTTP ought to be forced to provide wholesale access to it. It's already an expensive process so we shouldn't be doing it multiple times.

  • AndrueC
  • 9 months ago

Assuming you mean duplication of full fibre, agree with that Andrue. As happens for the other utilities where there is only one pipe or cable to any property, the Govt should sell off (smallish) parcels of areas, where the winner has to commit to 100% full fibre in that area in a timescale. Then the supplier gets a period (say 15yrs) exclusivity, but has to provide wholesale access under certain terms in addition to any services they may offer. The current open market results in saturation in some areas, with more incentive to overbuild or wait to be paid by govt to do it.

  • olicuk
  • 9 months ago

Yup. I stopped of short of trying to say /how/ that could be achieved but yours sounds like a workable solution. Coupled with some kind of subsidy that made harder to cover areas more attractive, perhaps.

  • AndrueC
  • 9 months ago

What happens if no one buys the franchise for full fibre in an area?

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 9 months ago

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