Broadband News

UK broadband speed test results for December 2017

Our analysis of the speed test results for December follow the same established patterns for the various providers so in that sense hold no major surprises, but it is important to keep publishing the results every month as the range of providers we can talk about is second to none in the UK. The inclusion of the speed ranges does make for a more complex figure filled table, but helps to show the range of speeds seen by the customers of the various services, and as we are into the first month of 2018 remember to make your mark in the 2018 data sets by running a speed test.

For those not up to speed with the popularity of the various providers and their packages, we can reveal that the most popular products we saw in the December results in descending order of popularity were Sky ADSL2+, Sky Fibre (up to 38 Mbps), BT Infinity 1 (FTTC), BT ADSL/ADSL2+, Virgin Media 100 Mbps, TalkTalk ADSL2+, BT Infinity 2 (FTTC), Virgin Media 200 Mbps, TalkTalk Fibre (up to 38 Mbps), Virgin Media 50 Mbps, Plusnet ADSL/ADSL2+, Plusnet Fibre (up to 38 Mbps), EE ADSL/ADSL2+. The continued popularity of the ADSL/ADSL2+ products is why the UK average speed that we have updated to include the full Q4 2017 results over at https://labs.thinkbroadband.com/local/ is not racing ahead due to the speeds of services like Hyperoptic Gigabit and the Virgin Media 300 Mbps service.

Ignoring the technology splits our popularity ranking for the major providers is BT Consumer, Sky, Virgin Media, TalkTalk, Plusnet, EE, Vodafone Broadband, Post Office, Daisy Wholesale, Zen Internet, KCOM, Origin Broadband, Hyperoptic, Eclipse Internet, IDNet, Gigaclear, AAISP, Entanet, Demon Internet and the list goes on.

The challenge in 2018 should be less about rolling out more faster and faster services, but learning why those in areas with faster options have not upgraded and what can be done to get people to upgrade and thus retire older services. Clearly for those with slow decade old ADSL/ADSL2+ services as their only option they will be desperate for a faster option, but given the way the BDUK contracts work increasing take-up will release more money and thus increase the chance for those with only slow options to see a better option, so long as the local authority decides that increased roll-out is a good use of the money.

The 60 Fastest UK Broadband Providers and Services in December 2017

(Ordered by Median Download Speed)
Smaller providers without enough geographic data samples are not included
All speeds in Mega bits per second - Mbps

ProviderQualityDirectionSpeed of bottom 10%Speed of bottom 20%MedianMeanSpeed of Top 20%Speed of Top 10%
Hyperoptic GigabitB (0.8)Down 102.3 116.8 168.6 270.2 405.4 664.6
    Up 77.2 94.5 148.4 220.1 267.1 574.8
Virgin Media 300 MbpsB (1.0)Down 54.6 79.8 162.7 165.2 217.4 292.6
    Up 12 12.6 16.4 19.5 20.7 21.6
BT Infinity 3&4 (FTTP)A (0.2)Down 67.2 74 131.5 145.2 201.2 284
    Up 10.3 21.8 28 25.6 29.9 30.6
Gigaclear 200 MbpsA (0.4)Down 101.2 102.4 106.8 126 179.6 184.7
    Up 44.1 71.7 92.8 86.6 128.8 145.7
Virgin Media 200 MbpsB (0.8)Down 28.9 42.7 86.4 90 130.9 164.2
    Up 5.8 6.7 9.9 9.4 11.8 12.1
TalkTalk (FTTH - York UFO)B (0.8)Down 19.2 19.9 81.6 84.5 123.4 209
    Up 2.8 4.3 20.6 25.2 37.2 61.6
BT Infinity 2 (FTTP)A (0.4)Down 40.2 50 68.7 74.2 80.3 117
    Up 12.1 14.7 19.2 17.9 20.9 21.2
AAISP up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.2)Down 35.2 43.2 57 56.3 72.5 73.1
    Up 8.2 10.5 15.1 14.5 18.1 18.6
Zen Internet up to 76 (FTTC)A (0.1)Down 30.2 40.5 55.6 53.8 68.6 73.8
    Up 9.3 10.8 16 14.9 18.4 18.7
BT Infinity 2 (FTTC)A (0.2)Down 36.3 42.9 55.1 54.9 69.3 72.9
    Up 10 11.6 16.3 15.2 18.1 18.6
IDNet up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.1)Down 27.6 38.7 54.2 53.4 68.1 73
    Up 9.2 10.3 16.4 14.9 18.5 18.8
KCOM Lightstream (FTTP)A (0.5)Down 17.3 26.6 52.3 77.7 105.8 174.1
    Up 4.4 5 13.7 19.7 27.7 29.2
Plusnet Fibre Extra up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.2)Down 38.2 41.1 51.1 53 67.4 72.2
    Up 7.4 9.1 13.8 13.3 17.9 18.4
EE Fibre Plus up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)D (1.7)Down 32.4 38.3 48.7 50.1 63.9 71.1
    Up 8.9 10.1 15.2 14.2 18.1 18.5
Sky Fibre Pro up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.4)Down 33.4 38.5 46.7 48.6 61.2 68.4
    Up 7.5 9.7 14.9 13.7 18 18.5
Smaller providers up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.3)Down 20.3 27.6 46.4 47.4 68.3 73.1
    Up 9.4 10.8 16.6 18.8 18.6 33.1
Vodafone up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.3)Down 24.8 36 46.2 47.2 61.6 69.9
    Up 9 10.6 14.9 14.1 17.4 17.9
TalkTalk Fibre Plus up to 76 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.3)Down 31.2 37.9 45.3 47.7 60.8 69.2
    Up 7.6 9.4 13.8 13.5 17.9 18.4
Virgin Media 100 MbpsB (0.8)Down 15.8 22.2 44.8 48.8 75 88.2
    Up 3.7 4.3 5.2 5 5.8 6
Hyperoptic 100 MbpsB (0.9)Down 15.4 28 44.1 49 72.6 82.1
    Up 1.3 6.2 34.3 33.7 55.7 67.6
Gigaclear 100 Mbps (FTTH)A (0.6)Down 22.1 26.2 41.1 45.6 57.8 82
    Up 13.8 17.3 32.7 37 48 75.7
B4RN (FTTP)B (1.1)Down 10.7 13 41 83.2 100.8 277.4
    Up 3.4 8.6 15.5 50.9 69.3 166.6
SeeTheLight - IFNL (FTTH)A (0.3)Down 9.3 19.9 39.1 44.9 51.2 58.7
    Up 2.3 5.6 11.2 13.6 12.4 22.4
Daisy Wholesale (FTTC/FTTP)A (0.5)Down 9.9 16.1 32.4 35.1 55.3 66.6
    Up 3.4 5.2 9.1 10.7 17.3 18.3
BT Infinity 1 up to 52 Mbps (FTTP)A (0.7)Down 11.7 16.1 30.7 30.7 47.2 50.3
    Up 3.1 4 7.1 6.9 9.9 10.3
Origin Broadband (FTTC)A (0.7)Down 11.2 16.1 28 29.8 42.4 48.8
    Up 3 4.3 8.6 8.6 12.3 16.2
Plusnet Fibre up to 38 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.5)Down 12.1 16.4 26.6 25.4 35.3 36.9
    Up 2 2.9 5 5 7.2 8.2
BT Infinity 1 up to 52 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.4)Down 11.2 15.5 26.6 27.1 38.3 45.2
    Up 2.3 3.3 5.2 5.3 7.7 8.7
Zen Internet up to 38 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.4)Down 11.1 16.6 25.8 24.6 34.9 36.6
    Up 2.3 2.9 6.1 5.8 8.5 9
Post Office (FTTC)A (0.7)Down 8.8 14 25.6 26.7 37.1 40.2
    Up 2.3 3.3 6.8 7.3 9.1 15.8
EE Fibre up to 38 Mbps (FTTC)C (1.5)Down 10.2 13.9 24.6 23.5 33.9 35.8
    Up 2.3 3.3 5.4 5.4 7.7 8.4
Sky Fibre up to 38 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.6)Down 10.6 14.7 23.5 23 31.9 35.2
    Up 2.5 3.5 5.5 5.5 7.7 8.4
TalkTalk Fibre up to 38 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.5)Down 10.5 14.4 23 23.2 33.3 36.6
    Up 2.3 3.2 5.1 5.3 7.6 8.5
Vodafone up to 38 Mbps(FTTC)A (0.6)Down 9.9 13.9 22.8 22.8 32.7 36.3
    Up 2.3 3.4 5.3 5.3 7.5 8.1
Smaller Providers up to 38 Mbps (FTTC)A (0.7)Down 6.9 9.7 19.5 20.1 30.5 35.9
    Up 1.7 2.4 4.9 5.1 8.1 8.8
EE Mobile 3G/4GC (1.2)Down 3.4 6.7 19.3 25.7 39.1 54.1
    Up 0.4 0.7 3 6 10 15.9
Airband (Fixed Wireless)A (0.7)Down 5.5 9.3 19 22 29.5 31.1
    Up 0.9 1.9 4.1 5.6 5 15.1
Virgin Media 50 MbpsB (1.1)Down 2.3 4.6 18.7 22.6 42.2 52
    Up 0.6 1.1 2.3 2.1 2.9 3
Vodafone Mobile 3G/4GC (1.5)Down 3.4 5.9 15.2 18.7 28 37.4
    Up 0.7 1.2 3.5 5 8.2 12.1
Relish 4G LTE (Fixed Wireless)C (1.3)Down 0.8 3.9 15 14.8 23.2 29.2
    Up 0.1 0.5 2 2.1 3.7 4.8
Hyperoptic 20 MbpsD (2.1)Down 1.5 4.9 14.6 13.2 20.8 25
    Up 0.2 0.6 0.8 0.8 1 1
O2 WiFiC (1.2)Down 0.6 4.2 13.2 19.7 26.5 41.6
    Up 0.4 1 3.3 4.5 7.5 9.9
O2 Mobile 3G/4GC (1.7)Down 1.9 4 12 15.9 25.5 35.3
    Up 0.4 0.8 2.4 3.9 5.6 10.2
Three Mobile 3G/4GC (1.2)Down 2.2 4.1 11.5 17.5 28.2 41.8
    Up 0.4 0.8 1.8 4.6 7.8 13.7
Europasat (Satellite)A (0.4)Down 3 4.9 10.9 11.4 19.4 20.1
    Up 0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3
Quickline (Fixed Wireless)C (1.2)Down 0.3 3.3 10 10 14.7 17.6
    Up 0.4 1 2.5 3.8 5.7 6.9
Avonline (Satellite)A (0.1)Down 3.5 5.9 9.5 12.2 18.8 26
    Up 0 0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
AAISP ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.6)Down 2.4 4.9 8.7 10 15 17.9
    Up 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.9 1
KCOM ADSL2+A (0.6)Down 1.7 2.6 7.1 7.5 12.2 13.9
    Up 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8
Demon Internet ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.4)Down 0.2 2.8 7 7.6 12.7 14.9
    Up 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8
Zen Internet ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.5)Down 1.2 1.9 6.1 7.4 13.1 15.7
    Up 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.9
Daisy Wholesale ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.6)Down 0.9 1.7 5.8 6.9 12.7 16.2
    Up 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.8 0.9
Sky ADSL2+A (0.6)Down 1.1 2.1 5.7 6.8 11.4 14.7
    Up 0.3 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.9
Eclipse Internet ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.5)Down 0.9 2 5.7 6.4 11.2 13.9
    Up 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.9
Plusnet ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.6)Down 0.9 2 5.6 6.8 11.8 15.1
    Up 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.6 0.8 0.9
Vodafone Broadband ADSL2+A (0.7)Down 1.3 2 5.4 7.2 12.4 16.6
    Up 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.8 1
EE ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.7)Down 0.9 1.9 5.3 6.5 11.4 14.2
    Up 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.9 0.9
TalkTalk ADSL2+A (0.6)Down 0.8 1.7 5.1 6.3 10.8 13.8
    Up 0.2 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8
Origin Broadband ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.7)Down 1.2 2.5 4.9 6.1 9.9 12.1
    Up 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.7
BT ADSL/ADSL2+A (0.7)Down 0.8 1.6 4.8 6.3 11.1 14.8
    Up 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.8 0.9

The quality metric has a longer explanation in our speed test FAQ, but the short answer is the closer to zero the sooner the test reached a steady speed and the better it held that speed for the duration of the test.

Comments

@thinkbroadband Are you including Wireless ISPs in your reports? Thanks. I see you have "smaller providers up to… https://t.co/FjaLc2Y8Rz

  • @StephenSatCisco
  • comment via twitter
  • 14 days ago

In some other countries, telcos have just moved ADSL customers to VDSL and shipped them with a new router "you will get more speed for the same price". Here we are expected to change our providers every year to benefit from the discounted initial rate, so that could in theory happen there if operators dropped the slowest VDSL package price to ADSL level and stopped selling ADSL to those who can get FTTC.

As long as FTTC carries a "premium" image, cost-aware people will shun it, even though the premium is just a couple of pounds per month.

Just my thought.

  • hvis42
  • 14 days ago

@hvis42 - I know of a country that has done this however they have a much smaller coverage base to upgrade and a better organised network...

For instance, in Canada one telephone connections cabinet might house 25-300 lines which is fairly easy to connected to a DSLAM supplying VDSL signal however in the UK we have cabinets with 500-700 (and potentially more) that would take 2+ cabinets to serve all those lines with VDSL.

Also UK has multiple ISP's with their equipment in exchanges, most countries such as canada have one provider and then have resellers, Alberta, Canada for instance being...

  • mlmclaren
  • 14 days ago

"Are you including Wireless ISPs in your reports?" The report includes Airband, Relish and Quickline.

  • MCM999
  • 14 days ago

... operated by Telus.

Almost seems like the UK competitive market is now starting to fight back against innovation. :(

  • mlmclaren
  • 14 days ago

hvis42

Exactly right

Folk are counting pennies. You want them to upgrade, offer them a deal they can't refuse

  • 961a
  • 14 days ago

@thinkbroadband Got the chance to upgrade last year. Received email: "76 Mbps available in your area". Prev was g… https://t.co/qcP24Gs0KG

  • @StephenSatCisco
  • comment via twitter
  • 14 days ago

Openreach can't migrate customers from ADSL and shut it off.

The root of many issues now is simply LLU. The copper addiction in the UK all about Sky, TalkTalk et al wanting to sweat their LLU equipment for longer.

On the topic in hand the B4RN results are interesting and definitely make the case that a gigabit to all is a huge waste for right now due to in-home issues.

  • CarlThomas
  • 13 days ago

Hi Broadband Watchers.
As more Bespoke FTTC,s are inserted in the cable runs the ADSl customers that have been barred due to their long runs (post codes ) will take up the Service which will be available on TBB maps or by the advertising from the ISP,s as the pressure from U swi tch kicks in. This is already being seen in Surrey at various Cabs. Plus the overlay of fibre direct.

  • Blackmamba
  • 13 days ago

@carlthomas Gigabit may be huge waste now, but if there is a need to do something in an area, it might be reasonable to consider FTTP nevertheless. No one predicts demand of bandwidth to decrease, and investing now into something that provides in 20-30Mbps range, it just means they have to invest again in the same area in a couple of years. For those who can't benefit from easy 60+ Mbps FTTC or G.Fast installations, it might be cheaper in the long run to invest only once instead of doing it over and over again to a barely acceptable level.

  • hvis42
  • 13 days ago

On exchanges with competition, the ADSL offering tends to have a price advantage. So the policy of upgrading those with the best connections, will have inevitably provided an upgrade path to many for whom the existing connection was more than fast enough for them, so there is no need from them to upgrade for higher price to get a speed they don't feel they need. Until they have a need or financial incentive, they have no need to change.

  • brianhe
  • 13 days ago

Hi,
As I have commented several times the broadband speed map keeps crediting my Sky unlimited speed to BT and presumably the lower BT speed to my Sky connection. Same postcode and cabinet is probably the problem.

  • RRShadow
  • 9 days ago

@RRShadow

Believe these are you
http://tbb.st/1510961238565695855
http://tbb.st/1515368139202315855

And the ISP detected is Sky (both for IPv4 and IPv6), and when I look at the right place on the maps they are showing as Sky. NOTE: You will need to zoom in since out at lower zoom levels postcodes are merged together which does confuse people, but the merging is common for many map presentation type sites.

If you still believe we are showing your results as 'BT' then provide a screenshot of what you can see so we can investigate.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 days ago

@RRShadow. Another example of what Andrew is saying. The broadband speed map shows an arrow pointing directly to my post code at various levels of resolution. At the lowest resolution that had a box pointing to my postcode it shows a speed of 28.86Mbps from 17 tests using 5 ISPs. Scrolling in the speed changes to 32.99Mbps from 7 tests on 3 ISPs and at the highest resolution shows 67.36Mbs from 3 tests with a single ISP, these being mine. At the highest resolution I can see the neighbouring postcodes complete with their results that at the lower resolutions are merged with my own.

  • MCM999
  • 8 days ago

Among the reasons consumers are reluctant to upgrade a current LLU service is fear of going off-line for an unknown period during the upgrade and/or their details being sold to fraudsters by an overseas call centre. I recently cancelled my acceptance of a discount for changing the contract term after a series of incomprensible conversations led me to believe I would be disconnected and reconnected with a new router (and charged for the privilege). The experience caused me to lose confidence in the customer service of the operator concerned.

  • PhilipVirgo
  • 8 days ago

Consider the elderly they are a burgeoning part of the population and for a lot of them, there is no reason to leave the cosy confines of a decade old contract with BT, because they don't understand all this computer business, I'm not being ageist, this is what I hear time after time as I speak to a lot of old people in my business. They are resistant to change something that was set up for them by their children or a n other.
As far as a lot of them are concerned getting the odd email or similar doesn't warrant all the fuss of upgrading.

  • Necroscope445
  • 8 days ago

I upgraded to TalkTalk fast fibre broadband in January 2017 with "up to 38 Mb/s" speed and achieved a steady 27 Mb/s. This was acceptable.
By September 2017 the speed had dropped to a steady 14 Mb/s. Not acceptable.
Having complained to TalkTalk they did all the usual tests and sent me a new router. Nothing changed. Still a steady 14Mb/s.
Final comment from TalkTalk was that the speed was within their contractual limits (minimum 10 Mb/s maximum 38 Mb/s).
So that's it then. I would expect that changing to another ISP wouldn't change anything.

  • CaptJohn
  • 8 days ago

Interesting data; I have BT Infinity 2, was promised down 20 to 24 Mb, with minimum of 18Mb and up 4 to 5Mb.Rarely get above 16 or 17Mb down and 2.25 up and it is dropping out completely several times a day. Compare that with the figures you quote for average lowest 10%!
I have complained several times to BT, each time I have to go through the whole rigamarole of turning it off/ turn it on etc. Did eventually get an engineer out- confirmed my internal wiring fine (brand new house) and there is probably a fault on the line. Still waiting for Openreach to sort that.

  • steamingdave
  • 8 days ago

@Necroscope445
I have to agree. As an elderly user connected for 21 years via various ISPs the hassle is marked. Lately, I accepted rates which excluded line rental in spite of having been told months ago that future rates would include rental. Later chat revealed that this resulted from the existence of a current advanced line rental contract in its last weeks. Nothing said in the quote was untrue, it was just easy to misunderstand. Add to this the many adverts for rates which are actually for new users only, no wonder we hesitate to change and risk losing associated facilities.

  • bsg017
  • 8 days ago

@CaptJohn - TalkTalk routers have had a mixed reaction in terms of performance, so getting one of better DLink routers may help, or one of the good Broadcom based modems sitting in front of TalkTalk device as a bridge/modem.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 days ago

@steamingdave Why did you sign up to the expensive Infinity 2 with an estimate of just 20 to 24 Mbps?

It is likely that our systems will be identifying you as on Infinity 1 which would be a better service in terms of price at least.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 days ago

@Andrew How do you bridge two routers as never been able to do it My email address is [email protected] if you could please send me some info how to do it, please

  • smokeycat41
  • 8 days ago

Bridge...its not bridging two routers, but using one device that supports a bridge mode so is operating as just a VDSL2 modem and the second device is using an Ethernet WAN port and creating a PPPoE session.

Best to ask on forums.thinkbroadband.com as people can share their preferred devices. To keep it simple there are also broadcom based devices that can outperform some of the ISP supplied hardware e.g. if you use a decent broadcom chipset on a Huawei cabinet you may get G.INP enabled rather than interleaving error correction which improves latency while also giving you better download sync

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 8 days ago

As much as I'm all for increasing broadband speed by buying and installing a new router I would regard this as a bit of a gamble as I have acheived an acceptable speed using the original TalkTalk router. Even when I was sent a "Super Router" nothing changed. The reason that TalkTalk gave for the drop in speed from 27Mbps to 14Mbps was that "there are more people using the system"!

  • CaptJohn
  • 7 days ago

Twelve years on from BT ADSL Max and at least we have ADSL2+ now and 21CN, but still only about 2.6 Mbps or less per line. My three lines are very effectively combined (by AA and my Firebrick IP Router) to give 6 to 8 Mbps downstream 1.2 to 1.5 upstream even on a single TCP connection. Figures depending on which speed tester you use.

FTTP please, for less than a couple of hundred grand. Politicians, have some decency, the postcode lottery is just an injustice.

  • CecilWard
  • 3 days ago

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