Broadband News

Four minutes to work out that we currently see 3.57 million premises under 10 Mbps

All three figures for the number of premises under 10 Mbps are likely to be calculated correctly or to at least within the tolerances of the data set they are based upon, and we can add a fourth figure to this ballet of PR with a very quick four minute calculation based on speeds we see the public testing at during Q2/2017.

  1. Ofcom 1.4 million premises is based on the availability of services using data from April/May 2016 and verifying this from the Ofcom public data set is hampered by removal of small postcodes from the data set. Note: Small postcodes occur in both urban and rural settings, e.g. many central London areas have lots of single premise postcodes.
  2. BIG Broadband 2.0 6.7 million premises is based on an analysis of Ofcom Connected Nations report, so is based on connection speed data providers have supplied in 2016 (and some may be from 2015)
  3. thinkbroadband 904,000 premises is the figure from 25th July 2017, and is changing weekly with the general trend downwards, but sometimes it can go up e.g. spot a new housing development that does not have superfast available to it. Back in May 2016 our figure for number of premises under 10 Mbps was 4.6% so 1.32 million premises, i.e. pretty much the same as the Ofcom report.
  4. thinkbroadband 3.57 million premises is based on a fast four minute analysis of the number of speed tests we see for ADSL2+, FTTC, cable and FTTH that are under 10 Mbps and the basic knowledge that 23.5 million broadband connections exist in the UK. 26% of ADSL/ADSL2+ tests in Q2 were under 10 Mbps, 7% of FTTC tests under 10 Mbps, 10% of cable broadband under 10 Mbps and 5% of FTTH under 10 Mbps.

The problem with the many figures is that the highest 6.7 million will chime well with those who even after many years of superfast broadband roll-outs are aggrieved that they do not have a faster option. The Ofcom figure while still quoted as the official one is now well over a year old and thus any cost for implementing a Universal Service Obligation could be significantly out, and if the USO footprint is smaller you can spend the same money and deliver a much better and more future proof technical solution.

Potentially further analysis of our speed tests results and comparison with the coverage data could arrive at things like average speeds where only a slower than 10 Mbps product is available, and average speeds in the better part of the UK, and many other permutations are possible, but the stark reality is that the superfast roll-outs need to continue and people need to keep upgrading to those services.

Comments

Title needs editing

  • ian007jen
  • 4 months ago

And that has been fixed :-)

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 4 months ago

2 BIG Broadbad 2.0 6.7 million premises...

Really Broadbad?

  • John_Gray
  • 4 months ago

I'm one of those stuck in the slow lane on an EO line with a 4 Mbs connection and on Bt's checker it says in scope but work hasn't started yet and its been like that for about 18 mths

  • 2beers
  • 4 months ago

2beers, I feel your pain! I live 9 miles from central London and get 3Mbps, been waiting for 7 years so far for Openreach to upgrade the cab, but they never do. The checker is stuck on "We are exploring solutions". 4G is the only other option.
www.wellingfibre.co.uk

  • jacko0
  • 4 months ago

2beers, I feel your pain! I live 9 miles from central London and get 3Mbps, been waiting for 7 years so far for Openreach to upgrade the cab, but they never do. The checker is stuck on "We are exploring solutions". 4G is the only other option.
www.wellingfibre.co.uk

  • jacko0
  • 4 months ago

At least you have another option as I live about 1.5 miles from the centre of inverness and don't even get 4G. I just wish Openreach would extract the digit and just get on with it

  • 2beers
  • 4 months ago

I have a suggestion. Lobby all users stuck on 0.5 to say 4 Meg. Lines to all switch service providers in the same month. December would be good. Stuff them all with a mother of all headaches and then threaten to do it again next year if speeds are not improved. Nothing focusses a businessman more than having to pay out for not meeting target dates.

  • Webbas
  • 4 months ago

Stuck on generally 3.5Meg, long line, cabinet upgraded but too far from it. No 4G and only limited 3G, so no real alternative, looks like there has never been any plans to deal with long lines.

  • brianhe
  • 4 months ago

Don't know why Openreach cant just divert the lines to a cabinet close by as I'm sure that the lines must pass through a manhole nearby the cabinets

  • 2beers
  • 4 months ago

Those people currently trapped, and restricted, on sub-10Mbps speeds likely feel like they are part of a big club - that 6.7m are being left behind, and it is all BTs fault. Shocking!

I imagine this report makes them feel better.

The truth that those being restricted (perhaps half of the 904,000 figure?) will be harder to accept, because it doesn't feel like they are part of a small club, getting smaller all the time.

Shapps is guilty of using overblown figures to advance his own agenda. Much like Broadbad 1.0.

  • WWWombat
  • 4 months ago

@2beers
That's a possibility (though not a certainty), and has been happening for EO lines throughout the UK - adding cabinets near the exchange, far from the exchange, and rearranging copper into an existing upgraded cabinet.

Such rearrangement usually costs more (per upgraded property) than simply adding an FTTC cabinet. They tend to happen late in the BDUK projects and without a 100% target yet, the people left out will be of this type: needing a more expensive version of rearrangement.

  • WWWombat
  • 4 months ago

@brianhe
Long lines - long D-side lengths on already-upgraded cabs - need work that gets progressively more expensive per upgraded property. These too need rearrangement work, alongside an infill "all in one" cabinet, or an FTTRN cabinet.

These too find their place late in the BDUK projects, and viability likely needs a group of long lines, not just one or two. But look for examples of AIO cabs.

  • WWWombat
  • 4 months ago

@Webbas

Would you expect much impact doing that?

The number stuck on such speeds are maybe half of the 900,000 that cannot get 10Mbps. And the number that want to upgrade are perhaps half of that. 225,000.

Enough to be noticed, but what proportion would join in? 5%? 10%? That would be closer to normal churn levels.

  • WWWombat
  • 4 months ago

There is actually little point in my friend switching if your line will only support 256k and nobody will do anything about it (Congleton, Cheshire)

I personally am happy with less than 10M/b which supports streaming BT Sport quite adequately.

  • meldrew
  • 4 months ago

@brianhe is satellite not for you?

Everyone can get that. can get up to 40mbps and the install is covered by a grant

  • ZenUser27
  • 4 months ago

Not everyone can get satellite, have had this pointed out to me when saying this publicly before, e.g. people with a big hill/mountain blocking southern sky, or in cities a larger building.

Another one is proximity to edge of an airfield

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 4 months ago

Not everyone can get satellite, have had this pointed out to me when saying this publicly before, e.g. people with a big hill/mountain blocking southern sky, or in cities a larger building.

Another one is proximity to edge of an airfield

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 4 months ago

On a new housing estate and lucky to get 2.5mbps. What is frustrating is that when being built Openreach were laying Fibre to the rest of the town, why didn't they go the extra 200 metres? Lack of forward planning and common sense.

  • BB_Nightmare
  • 4 months ago

New housing estates are private land so reliant on the agreements reached between developers and broadband infrastructure providers.

Also if estates were started some years ago the demand and pressures on broadband were so much lower that just ticking the phone line sorted box was the main issue for all concerned.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • 4 months ago

2.75 mbps on a good day, emphasis on the DAY part, because in the evening it can frequently dip below 1 mbps.

Why should I pay for "superfastbroadband" and only get speeds that some urban dwellers get on non-superfastbroadband?

  • Tony_Marone
  • 3 months ago

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