Broadband News

EU Digital Agenda Scorecard shows UK doing well

The EU as part of its Digital Agenda targets is monitoring the 27 EU countries for a wide range of metrics and has recently published its 2013 updates and contrary to the 'we're doomed' chorus that seems to accompany a lot of the coverage around UK broadband in many areas we are doing pretty well and it likely to that Jeremy Hunt's statement of the best broadband of a major European country may well be proven true to the annoyance of many.

Coverage of Next Generation Broadband Access Across Europe
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The above chart shows the standing of the UK in relation to Next Generation Access coverage, in other words how widely available super fast broadband is, and the UK at 11th out of 27th with 70.3% coverage is ahead of Germany (66.2%), France (24.2%), Spain (63.9%). The big question mark now is why if superfast is so widely available, does the UK sit in the middle with a take-up rate of 15.5% for superfast services?

Percentage of households subscribing to a standard broadband package
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It also seems that while we are worrying daily about how to improve broadband speeds for the most rural parts of the UK, that the current speed problems have not stopped us from only being second to Sweden in terms of the number of homes with a broadband connection subscription (85.6% versus 87%). Interestingly if you drill down into the data and look at households in sparsely populated areas (rural) the UK is leading with 87.2%, Sweden second at 85.4% and moving down the table Germany at 79.7%, France 71.7% and Spain 57.8%.

Median pricing of superfast broadband across Europe
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The price of superfast broadband services is probably the most often stated stumbling block when people are looking at better broadband but the UK fares suprisingly well, since for a broadband/telephone bundle we are the fifth cheapest country when looking at the median price and fourth cheapest if you for the same bundle but where the advertised speed is 8 Mbps or faster.

If you want to delve into the statistics there is a good tool that gives access to the many metrics and filters on the Digital Agenda website.

Comments

Oh no, not facts ! We're supposed to rely on campaigners and bloggers aren't we ?

  • herdwick
  • over 3 years ago

"'I am today announcing an ambition to be not just the best, but specifically the fastest broadband of any major European country by 2015'." - it should be borne in mind that politicians can choose how they define major European country. Netherlands?

  • mikejp
  • over 3 years ago

EU 5 is the usual list of major countries.

Italy, France, Germany, Spain and UK these comprise 42% of the EU population alone.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 3 years ago

Aha! So we only need to beat 4? Then yes, JH may be right.

  • mikejp
  • over 3 years ago

Yes - the relative sizes become kinda important.

That first graph, coverage of NGA by % of household, has the UK in 10th place.

However, the actual number of households covered in the UK is almost the same as the total of all of the 9 countries ahead of it.

Nice to see us overtaking Germany in that category in 2012 though.

  • WWWombat
  • over 3 years ago

"Why if superfast is so widely available, does the UK sit in the middle with a take-up rate of 15.5% for superfast services?"

Is that, although SFBB now has a higher availability, it has only just become available to most? Because it takes some time for people to gradually switch over to it?

Or perhaps because we are bottom (best) in the table that shows how much std bb costs (7 Euros), and people don't want to pay more?

  • WWWombat
  • over 3 years ago

@Andrew

Using the DA website statistics, it shows 2012 population figures for EU: 500 million, and for the EU5 a total of 317 million, or 63%.

If you add Poland to the EU5, it becomes 356 million, or 71%.

  • WWWombat
  • over 3 years ago

For the country that was the cradle of the industrial revolution, inventor of the telephone, television and digital computer, it seem pretty shameful that we are playing catch up with Latvia for NGA to the net.

  • Plankton1066
  • over 3 years ago

To the question of Superfast take up. If the vast majority of deployments are in urban areas in spitting distance of ADSL2+ enabled exchanges why would you pay extra when you are all ready getting enough speed to do everything you need? Where I am, with 1mbps, I'll sign up on the day I can get anything better because the internet consumer applications/content I desire have surpassed the current speed I have. If I had 15mbps I probably wouldn't bother. I suspect that in 3 years time 15mbps will attract laughter, but that's enough matter.

  • Plankton1066
  • over 3 years ago

Good point Plankton, I get a very reliable 3+Meg(nearer 4)with ADSL Max and I'm currently happy with it. Eleven years ago I was enjoying the internet with dial-up so 3+Meg - WOW!

  • zhango
  • over 3 years ago

According to the stats the UK has 70.3% NGA, but how is this measured? By Exchange or Cabinet, if the former then it will be, by definition, inaccurate as a large percentage of cabinets are excluded in any one area. All the indicator says is 'served by' which is not detailed enough.

  • somersetbob
  • over 3 years ago

"...why if superfast is so widely available, does the UK sit in the middle with a take-up rate of 15.5% for superfast services?"

Both questions can be answered with the old chestnut. Superfast has up been rolled out to the same populated areas that have already got good service. Hence the high coverage. Hence the low take-up.

"Interestingly if you drill down into the data and look at households in sparsely populated areas (rural) the UK is leading with 87.2%,"

Hence demand is high in rural areas, which have been constantly ignored in superfast rollout, and ADSL before that.

  • csimon
  • over 3 years ago

Takeup for basic broadband may be high in rural areas, but the final 5% of the UK is covered by around 2,500 telephone exchanges. Can be worked out from TalkTalk LLU coverage info.

Which means people are a lot more spread out, and the homes per cabinet/exchange ratio will be a lot lower.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 3 years ago

That is if you have cabinets at all... We are still waiting on *ANY* word as to the cabinet less exchanges. I guess they will just sit on that one until there is no-one complaining anymore...

  • vicdupreez
  • over 3 years ago

Exchange only lines - down to what the BDUK projects have as their priorities so may vary from county to county

How many premises are on these exchanges with no cabinets?

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 3 years ago

@csimon that just is not true, unless you call 2Mbps (what I used) to get a good service?

  • GMAN99
  • over 3 years ago

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