Broadband News

ITU call for ubiquitous cheap broadband

The ITU (International Telecommunication Union) is calling for broadband to be ubiquitous and affordable as they expect high-speed networks to transform the world. Currently around 30% of people in wealthy Western European countries have a broadband subscription and this generally costs about 1% or less of monthly income. The BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) have penetration of around 10% and costs around 5% of the average income whilst in the poorest countries, fixed broadband penetrates below 1% and costs more than 100% of the average monthly income.

Country Fixed broadband subscriptions
per 100 inhabitants
Affordability of fixed broadband
as percentage of monthly income
USA 27.1% 0.5%
UK 29.8% 0.63%
Canada 29.7% 0.71%
Australia 25.4% 0.77%
France 31.1% 1.02%
Germany 30.4% 1.23%
South Korea 33.8% 1.41%
Russia 9.2% 1.66%
Brazil 7.5% 4.58%
India 0.7% 5.84%
China 7.7% 7.19%
Broadband penetration and affordability. Source: ITU

"Broadband is today's truly transformational technology. As with the dawn of other inventions that profoundly reshaped our society, most of us are yet to see the tremendous power and potential of these networks. It's not just about fast web browsing. Through e-health, e-education, e-government, smart grids, smart transport systems and much more, broadband will power economic and social progress in the 21st century. When we first harnessed electricity, we thought: 'lighting'. But the advent of the power grid was the tipping point that led to the building of skyscrapers, the rapid rise of large-scale industry, mass mobility, and even – through labour-saving home appliances – the emancipation of women."

Dr Hamadoun Touré, (Secretary-General) ITU

Dr Touré is also vice chair for the Broadband Commission who will be presenting a report to the UN on the 19th September which will detail the power broadband has to improve our world. They believe that it has the same level of importance as the basic infrastructure of a modern society such as roads and the electricity network.

Comments

It doesn't need to be any cheaper in the UK, if anything its too cheap and is part of the problem we are having now. Faster speeds are now being rolled out but people don't want to pay extra for it.

  • GMAN99
  • over 6 years ago

Or they dont want to pay for the restrictions some of these faster services have. (Still hoping BT see sense and officially announce that tooted new 300gig figure and still waiting on Virgin to offer something new).

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

I don't even think that's the problem CB I still think the majority of people just don't need or want these new speeds of 30-100Mb I'm convinced the majority of users in the UK still just browse and email and for that all they want is a cheap (but stable) connection and that a good 10Mb connection will be fine for the majority. I'm not saying that the demand for higher speeds doesn't exist, some people do want it, but I don't think its the majority

  • GMAN99
  • over 6 years ago

As ever its spotting the difference between a vocal 5% and the demand from the silent masses.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 6 years ago

"ITU call for ubiquitous cheap broadband"

I wonder if the ITU are willing to pay for the provision of ubiquitous cheap broadband...

  • TaRkADaHl
  • over 6 years ago

Do they also call for cheap phone calls?

  • GMAN99
  • over 6 years ago

Agree in part GMAN99 at this moment in time 40 and 50Mb isnt needed, id like it but i dont need it. I get good ADSL2+ speeds, for me to upgrade id want more from the service as a whole. More speed would be nice, but i wouldnt want a BT option 1 infinity product with 40gig a month, and i wouldnt want speed managed at x time 20Mb from Virgin. Both would be faster (virgin 20Mb just) than my current ADSL2+, but id just be trading not worrying about usage to faster speed but worrying about usage and times i can use. Or i spose the short version is on a pro vs cons list its still equal so no point.

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

What would be a good option to have is to be able to use say 50% of available download speed to upload as and when needed, instead of this 24mbps+ down and 1.3 or 2.5mbps upload,as for your bt infinity products no thanks,as usage cap too small,and i for one would not see improvement as the line from street cab to my house is subject to outside noise ect

  • tommy45
  • over 6 years ago

GMAN99 has it about right, the UK has one of the cheapest prices for broadband. For us the issue is no longer price it is performance. All the time the market is being fooled into thinking free or low cost broadband gives the same performance as broadband from a supplier that allocates adequate bandwidth to each user we won't fix that issue.

  • Rocklett
  • over 6 years ago

Cheap is ok if you get the service. anyway, I am happy with my 4Megabits, sure it would be nice to have more, but I am not bothered. I can do everything I want to do. It is not so much sync speed, it is the shaping that is the problem

  • zyborg47
  • over 6 years ago

I don't understand tommy's comment about outside noise, all phone lines are subject to it, shorter copper part, means higher level signal and thus less prone to noise. At worst VDSL2 should perform as ADSL2+, but if you are removing 1km of copper cable, you will see a speed jump.

As for BT Infinity - this is just one product using FTTC, in time more providers with different allowances will be offering it.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 6 years ago

What about people in games and virtual worlds don't they need speed?
Also where are they on the list?
Someone being clever with the survey questions and figures pubbblished.

  • David-Park
  • over 6 years ago

Sorry my above comment as gone into wrong news story.

  • David-Park
  • over 6 years ago

quote"As for BT Infinity - this is just one product using FTTC, in time more providers with different allowances will be offering it."

Care to elaborate who will be offering FTTC and not be at the mercy of BT pricing?

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

That's not what he said. BT Infinity is BT Broadband's FTTC offering, other ISP's will also offer FTTC and package it up how they like.

  • GMAN99
  • over 6 years ago

^^^ And whos infrastructure will they be using and who will they be paying for it?
I ask as adrew mentioned allowances and id be interested in any company thats going to offer FTTC with significantly different allowances, ive not seen a unlimited (even just off peak) FTTC cabinet product yet which is sensibly priced.

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

To be clear - the Openreach FTTC link from cutomer to exchange obviously does not have allowances.

  • Somerset
  • over 6 years ago

To be even clearer... Who provides this product to users with no caps? Oh thats right nobody so that comment was pointless. andrew clearly mentions "providers"

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

Any caps are not due to the FTTC technology though.

  • Somerset
  • over 6 years ago

No they are down to providers and thats why i asked.

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

"Care to elaborate who will be offering FTTC and not be at the mercy of BT pricing? "

Anyone that wants to as the FTTC product is from Openreach and the pricing is regulated by Ofcom.

  • New_Londoner
  • over 6 years ago

@Tarka
" "ITU call for ubiquitous cheap broadband" I wonder if the ITU are willing to pay for the provision of ubiquitous cheap broadband... "

Completely agree - invariably the people making these sort of statements are not themselves offering to underwrite the investment, are happy to write cheques with other people's money.

  • New_Londoner
  • over 6 years ago

quote"Anyone that wants to as the FTTC product is from Openreach and the pricing is regulated by Ofcom."

Really in that case were ofcom involved in the decision relating to how much money Iwade had to give BT to install cabinets in that area for providers to supply from?

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

Different point entirely CB. The cost of putting in the infrastructure is not linked to the prices charged to service providers to deliver services over it. The latter prices are regulated by Ofcom.

Regarding the cost for providing the cabinet(s) in Iwade, I seem to recall previous posts against a much earlier new item(?) showing how this was determined via a tender process. Pretty much what you'd expect for public procurement really.

  • New_Londoner
  • over 6 years ago

quote"Different point entirely CB. The cost of putting in the infrastructure is not linked to the prices charged to service providers to deliver services over it. The latter prices are regulated by Ofcom."

Actually both are meant to be regulated by ofcom. There was no page that showed any other individual company bid.

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

Any links to confirm FTTC infrastructure costs are regulated?

  • Somerset
  • over 6 years ago

FTTx costs aren't regulated at either level.

Remember that BT received regulatory concessions in return for the investment these being permission to set prices for access to the NGA as they see fit.

  • Dixinormous
  • over 6 years ago

God are you still going on about iwade? Any caps or shaping on any product (ADSL/VDSL) are up to the ISP who is delivering them, nothing to do with Openreach.

  • GMAN99
  • over 6 years ago

Costs regulated......
http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/fttc/fttc.pdf

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

Where in:

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/consultations/fttc/summary/fttc.pdf

  • Somerset
  • over 6 years ago

^^ different link

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

cb - yours is Page Not Found (404)

  • Somerset
  • over 6 years ago

Top link here...
http://search.ofcom.org.uk/search?q=fttc+costs&site=site&proxystylesheet=ofcom-redesign&output=xml_no_dtd&client=ofcom-redesign&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF-8&x=0&y=0

Maybe they quickly took it down as some BT staffer or shareholder rushed to tell them..... Is that why you want another ofcom link from me in the other story?

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

Unlikely... Do they take the original consultation documents off? You need to find the policy, not a consultation.

  • Somerset
  • over 6 years ago

It contained all the figure, funny the summary you linked to has had them removed.
I think ill keep the other ofcom link i promised you by wednesday in the other story to myself, keep the evidence of BTs mis-doings online this time.

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 6 years ago

Post a comment

Login Register