Broadband News

BBC iPlayer usage soars to new heights

The BBC iPlayer has helped boost the free-to-view TV consumption in the UK. Screen Digest, a media analyst firm, has released information (PDF) that shows 0.8bn TV streams and downloads were started by UK broadband users in 2007. Their analysis shows that video streams from the BBC, including iPlayer account for 38% of all free-to-view streams in the UK.

The BBC recently released a Flash based iPlayer that allows users on any operating system to view the content available via the iPlayer website. This is a big boost to iPlayer as it takes away the need to download a separate application to view the content. It also helps solve a problem where some users saw a conflict when iPlayer and the 4oD software, Channel 4's online streaming service, were both installed. The Flash player will also benefit broadband users as it uses streaming rather than a peer-to-peer distribution approach.

However, its hard to tell if iPlayer really is as successful as Screen Digest make out. Competing firm, Hitwise, released conflicting information earlier this year, stating that iPlayer usage has soared, but is still well behind YouTube in online video in the UK. Hitwise statistics did exclude viewers using the downloadable iPlayer software. Only time will tell how successful the iPlayer really is.

Comments

I had a look at the iPlayer last night and it would appear that a download only last for 30 days. Surely it makes sense to use a normal HD recorder at the time? As well as being permanent a TV recorder does not add to your monthly ISP quota either.

  • meldrew
  • over 9 years ago

The 30 days thing is due to DRM bloat in a download, it can be removed easily but stating how to do so may be sailing a bit close to the edge of the law.
As for monthly ISP quota if anyone wants to seriously use the bandwidth a broadband connection can give its best to avoid ISPs with fixed monthly caps. Another vote with your feet and go ADSL2+ LLU. (CONT)

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 9 years ago

Bandwidth intensive stuff like iplayer is the future... Even more programming on 4OD is free now than it use to be, all these new fangled games consoles have online abilities, services like lovefilm have improved and also became more popular, even apple is in on the act with 1080 HD movie trailer downloads... (CONT)

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 9 years ago

Its not gonna stop and BT and ISPs that use BT services to provide their customers sooner or later are gonna have to find away around these silly monthly caps etc otherwise LLU services and lets hope Fibre services are going to start knocking BT from the top position, the latest as i type news storys show just how popular ADSL2+ from the likes of sky and others is becoming.

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 9 years ago

It should be pointed out that not all LLU using ADSL2+ is without caps, and some of those without caps rely on traffic management to control usage.

The sums are such that if 90% of users on LLU were to try and manage 100GB a month each that fair use policies would become a lot more visible

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 9 years ago

Well I'll bet it will go the same way as Divx on HDD recorders... Divx is low quality video, but that is no problem - they want the programmme! I am sure they will look for a low bandwidth feed, to get what they want at lowest cost!!

  • comnut
  • over 9 years ago

quote"It should be pointed out that not all LLU using ADSL2+ is without caps, and some of those without caps rely on traffic management to control usage.
The sums are such that if 90% of users on LLU were to try and manage 100GB a month each that fair use policies would become a lot more visible."

I can only name one providing LLU ADSL2+ services that has caps and that is the service from newnet.... Sky, Bethere and ukonline do not have any fixed laid down in writing monthly cap. (CONT)

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 9 years ago

I would also say a heck of alot of people on ADSL2+ services have reached 100gig a month on occasions i know i have (and no before the regular mob ask i dont have to answer you for what and i have no intention to so dont bother asking, it happens get over it).

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 9 years ago

good old anderew the BT spin king :)
So if 90% of llu customers used 100gig FUP would kick in, of course, but if 90% of ipstream used just say 20gig that struggles far worse. There is more bandwidth per end user on BE/SKY LLU than there is on ipstream fact.

  • chrysalis
  • over 9 years ago

Here in lies the rub - you cannot say things like LLU ADSL2+ is great. Talk Talk actually deliver LLU using ADSL2+ but keep their 40GB cap.

A £30 LLU product should offer more usage than a £30 IPStream the pricing is such that it goes without saying.

BUT LLU networks can be run cramped at a low cost, it hardly matters whether it is ADSL2+ or ADSL for the DSL link.

  • andrew
  • thinkbroadband staff
  • over 9 years ago

quote"A £30 LLU product should offer more usage than a £30 IPStream the pricing is such that it goes without saying."

Or in other words from a customers point of view where possible take the LLU option and get more for your money.
Also why talk talk may be using adsl2+ to deliver, you cant call it a adsl2+ service if it is not capable of delivering over 8Mb to anyone. A true adsl2+ service will, theres even though TECHNICALLY you can call it adsl2+ isnt really is it?

  • CARPETBURN
  • over 9 years ago

I disagree, andrew. The ISP could chose to spend the savings elsewhere on things like quality of service. Given the generally contended, restricted state of lines currently I'm rather surprised you missed that one...

  • Dawn_Falcon
  • over 9 years ago

Question - if the BBCi Player is a Peer-to-Peer system, doesn't that turn the iPlayer's user into a BBC transmitter? I will quite happily redefuse the Beebs programmes on MY line that I pay for, in exchange for a zero TV license!

  • Clearsky2
  • over 9 years ago

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