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Netflix 4k video streaming on its way
Tuesday 08 October 2013 17:44:39 by Andrew Ferguson

While the mainstream broadcasters are still figuring out how to provide 4K broadcasts it appears Netflix may in 2014 be offering 4K (3840 x 2160 pixels) resolution streams. The US based dslreports.com indicates that this ultra HD stream would run at around 15 Mbps.

Only recently Netflix added super HD to its video on-demand service, which was a less compressed HD stream. The high price of 4K televisions will put many off but with Netflix offering the streams at least those with the money will now have some content thus breaking the chicken and egg situation of what to watch that exploits your recent purchase.

With a movie weighing in at around 12GB if running at the expected bit-rate the need for an unlimited broadband connection becomes very obvious. For those with superfast broadband connections the 4K streams may still offer an improved picture, even when viewed on a 1080p TV.

Another subtle change for Netflix is that the iOS app now supports HD streaming, so if you've just seen your mobile data use suddenly increase and you use Netflix on train/bus heading to or from work then this may be the reason why.

Comments

Posted by pcoventry76 over 3 years ago
Good old netflix :) they are leading the way and make some amazing programs aswell!
Posted by c_j_ over 3 years ago
"a less compressed HD stream."

Marvellous.

They sell us digital technology because it's better (ho ho ho).

Then they compress it to hell and most of the way back, resulting in loss of detail, compression artefacts galore and picture quality frequently visually worse than 625 line analogue.

Now they have the cheek to say "hey, pay extra for our Super HD and you can have a proper decent HD picture" (like the one we promised in the first instance but never delivered).

/grumpy_old_man
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 3 years ago
Urm Netflix does not charge extra for the super HD and no suggestion of extra charges for the 4K.

Posted by Dilbert over 3 years ago
Why would they stream it at 4096 x 2160 pixels?

All the 4K TV's I have seen for sale so far have quoted resolutions of 3840 x 2160 pixels.

Only things I have seen with resolutions of 4096 x 2160 pixels are professional monitors that are aimed at film production/post production.
Posted by adslmax over 3 years ago
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) 32 minutes ago
Urm Netflix does not charge extra for the super HD and no suggestion of extra charges for the 4K.

If they do increasing price, I will cancel it no doubt about that!
Posted by Dixinormous over 3 years ago
They will at some point. Content costs money.

Seems I was wrong about 4K coming later rather than sooner, however we'll see if this is anything like mainstream.
Posted by pcoventry76 over 3 years ago
Netflix have spent over 10 Million so far making their programs. why would they up the price? They have proved what they can do with the subs they have and they have millions of subs all over the world.

They might stop making more to fund this who knows. But it's £6 a month.
Posted by pcoventry76 over 3 years ago
Sorry I meant 100 Million, House of Cards for example was 4.5 million an episode! - Hemlock Grove was 4 Million and Orange is the New Black was 3.9 million an episode!
Posted by pcoventry76 over 3 years ago
that's just 3 you got arrested development and the new one, I can't think of the others but there are loads!
Posted by FlappySocks over 3 years ago
@c_j_
Something wrong with your setup. Once Netflix ramps up to SuperHD, the picture quality is excellent. At least it is on the ps3.
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 3 years ago
Tweaked my horizontal resolution. Suspect the other figure stuck because production environment is only place I've seen 4k yet, and are not buying a new TV set. Unless Santa wants to bring a surprise present.
Posted by otester over 3 years ago
Seems the P2P networks aren't charging extra for 4K ;)

@Dilbert

Maybe so it's future proof.
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