Skip Navigation


Bad broadband in East Cleveland - stand up and be counted
Tuesday 27 August 2013 09:53:44 by Andrew Ferguson

While the big bold headlines are all about the fact that the BDUK target of 90% with access to superfast by May 2015 may miss its targets and not hit 90% until May 2016, there are lots of rural areas that have no plan at all beyond a vague wave of the arms saying you will get 2 Mbps. It is into this gap that varies in size from county to county, but nationally will still be 5% in 2017 (around 1.3 million premises) that the Rural Community Broadband Fund steps in and the latest project to surface covers the deeply rural parts of East Cleveland.

The project is being driven by Redcar and Cleveland Council who are looking for some £300,000 from the RCBF and needs residents and businesses in the proposed project area to express their desire for better broadband in the area, as without this 'evidence' the project will not go ahead. Given the likely poor state of connectivity in the area it is good to see the council is going to use a more traditional mail drop which properties should receive by 14th September.

The best map for the project is the one on the council's own website which shows the project outline skirting around the areas likely to be covered by the larger BDUK project, and while there are lots of woods such as Ness Hagg Wood and Goat Scar Wood there are small villages such as Liverton and Moorsholm, as well as farms down the atypical half mile long lane.

Comments

Posted by mikejp over 3 years ago
You would hope the 'closure' of BT Dial-up on 1 Sep would stimulate some reaction since I suspect there are a few dial-ups there as here.

Out of interest, will this closure affect other dial-ups eg AOL? It will leave any remaining BT dial-up customers in a bad way since they are unlikely to see anything for a few years from BDUK/RCBF
Posted by cyberdoyle over 3 years ago
Hi Mikejp, it won't affect other dial up services, just the BT one. They are recommending people move to their other service on plusnet. Re cleveland council, I hope they put the money into a proper service and not just add it to the BT pot for copper bonded lines. Removing dacs and laying new copper is not the future.
Posted by themanstan over 3 years ago
£300k won't go far CD...
Posted by herdwick over 3 years ago
Satellite is the most cost effective solution, surely ?
Posted by Somerset over 3 years ago
@cd - how much extra copper has been laid in Cornwall?
Posted by mikejp over 3 years ago
herdwick - "Satellite is the most cost effective solution, surely?" I cannot see why - it will not deliver the HSB speeds needed, latency is high and bandwidth significantly affected if users blossom, whereas a wireless solution is cheaper to put in place and it is a lot easier to nip up the pole and stick another sector aerial on or another fibre feed if needed. Install costs per property are probably cheaper too.
Posted by herdwick over 3 years ago
No idea why a wireless solution would be cheaper - the satellite is wireless and it's already up there. A lot of the tenders for "Connecting Cambridgeshire" were from satellite companies or coalitions. I thought it was about meeting the 2M to be honest, with references to mail drops, but now I see it's superfast.

Satellite installers are widespread and cost effective, wireless broadband much less so.

How do you nip up the pole and create more spectrum, pray ?
Posted by mikejp over 3 years ago
"I thought it was about meeting the 2M to be honest, with references to mail drops, but now I see it's superfast." - RCBF is
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 3 years ago
yes RCBF is superfast, the larger BDUK project should already ensure 2 Mbps to all, with RCBF carving off some areas and using a variety of solutions to go faster.
Posted by mikejp over 3 years ago
herdwick - "How do you nip up the pole and create more spectrum, pray" - pray your ladder is long enough to reach the satellite?
Posted by mikejp over 3 years ago
Not forgetting, of course, that satellite b/band is pretty well useless for gaming due to latency, so the average family would be advised to steer clear, and VOIP will also suffer.

Altogether it is a desperate 'last ditch' solution.
Posted by WWWombat over 3 years ago
Not forgetting, too, that all the satellites combined, including (as far as I can tell) some future launches, will still only point enough transponders at the UK for 2% or 3% of properties.

And that's at bandwidth averages from 2012 - and the averages are growing.

Satellite also doesn't meet the requirements of "affordable" for either basic or SFBB coverage.

It really is a solution of last resort only.
You must be logged in to post comments. Click here to login.