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Rutland County Council signs broadband contract with BT
Wednesday 16 May 2012 14:56:14 by Andrew Ferguson

Rutland County Council, which covers a mere 17,000 homes and businesses, has signed a £3 million contract with BT, to deliver fast, affordable fibre broadband to 90% of Rutland by the end of 2013.

It was known that Rutland was going to sign with BT back in March, but now the final public contract signing has taken place at Oakham Castle more detail on the roll-out plans have been published.

Openreach is to deploy its FTTC solution which is available as a wholesale service, this currently offers a maximum of 80 Mbps downstream and 20 Mbps upstream. The actual speed received is governed by the distance between a property and the cabinet. The roll-out will not stop at the 90% figure, as it appears Rutland County Council has access to additional funding that should let them push coverage to a level of 97%. The remaining 500 or so properties will see their connection speeds uplifted to 2 Mbps or faster, by the end of 2013.

The funding gap that the newspapers and tech press got worried about is being addressed with BT adding £800,000 to the project. Rutland County Council are contributing £2.2 million of which £710,000 was from the BDUK fund.

While FTTC is seen by some as old-fashioned and out of date, given the funding everyone wants to spend full fibre is not feasible. Where people are willing to pay the additional costs (you will need to live in an area with FTTC) once FTTP on Demand from Openreach is released, they will be able to get a full fibre connection installed to a property in 2013. While the cost is not fixed estimates of £500 to £1500 abound, and there may be options to spread the payments over the term of a contract. Rutland Telecom connected Hambleton in Rutland with a full fibre service in 2011, with a £50 monthly fee (25GB usage allowance) and £1000+ setup costs.

Comments

Posted by cyberdoyle over 5 years ago
It isn't fibre broadband if its coming from a cabinet.




Posted by chris6273 over 5 years ago
I agree; If you want to class FTTC as 'Fibre Broadband' then standard ADSL, ADSL2, ADSL2+ are Fibre Broadband aswell because of the fibre from the exchange's DSLAM/MSAN to the ISP's core network.

I'd be interested in whether Rutland Telecom will start providing products via the new BT Openreach's FTTC infrastructure.
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 5 years ago
Someone needs to tell the large numbers of fibre customers in europe which is fibre to the building, then copper ethernet around the building. Same argument applies :-)
Posted by BBpeter25 over 5 years ago
Just hope we're not in the missing 10%!!
Posted by tthom over 5 years ago
Rutland with a full fibre service in 2011, with a £50 monthly fee (25GB usage allowance) and £1000+ setup costs. is that correct? you have all that speed but limited to 25gb? stange
Posted by timmay over 5 years ago
So will this mean Rutland Telecom disappear?

Yet again it looks like a council has screwed things up for a local company, giving money to the big boys.
Posted by c_j_ over 5 years ago

"Yet again it looks like a council has screwed things up for a local company, giving money to the big boys. "

Councils don't have much choice in these things. The rules for any sizeable procurement process are set centrally, tenders for any given procurement are generally open and/or auditable and there's not a lot of room for preferring smaller local companies with local employees over massive global companies with "economies of scale" and offshore call centres and significant market power.

Posted by craigbrass over 5 years ago
@c_j_: Actually, there are many ways you can get around funding rules. Making the grants loans instead is one easy way. Hardly any EU rules on that. The problem is BDUK MANDATED to councils how they MUST do things or the funding will be clawed back. I had the conversation with Cumbria County Council and they have NO balls and simply won't test how BDUK would act if they went against them. Simply put, the whole exercise is an elaborate way of giving BT the lot decided at higher levels.
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Sorry Chris, I know you often like to rewrite network definitions but its not true

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_to_the_x

I saw your latest B4RN video and things look like they are really moving on, congrats it looks like its finally starting to take shape!
Posted by chris6273 over 5 years ago
I was talking about FTTC; There is still the Copper Cable from your House to the Cabinet where it is fibre.

The same way with Native ADSL, ADSL2 and ADSL2+ products its copper to the exchange where it is Fibre.

Both methods have fibre and copper in it so it seems wrong to call FTTC Fibre Broadband, when you are connected to an MSAN with fibre on ADSL, ADSL2 and ADSL2+.
Posted by themanstan over 5 years ago
@tthom

FTTH is expensive, Hambleton was around ~6k per property. Even B4RN which uses DIY fibre is still 2.6k per property. Any company rolling out needs to make a return on the investment in the medium term, at least, nowadays. The smaller the company the shorter the ROI.
Posted by themanstan over 5 years ago
@chris6273

He was aiming his response at the other Chris (CD). But didn't make it clear.
Posted by chris6273 over 5 years ago
Ahh right, nevermind.
Posted by Somerset over 5 years ago
Craig - local authorities may be wary of investing in small companies...
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Apologies Chris, yes I meant chris cyberdoyle :)

But as you can see FTTC is classed as fibre broadband
Posted by undecidedadrian over 5 years ago
I suppose Rutland CC went with the company who could deliver the project was also prepared to match money with it's own and it would be done in a relatively quick timeframe.

Also the 500 properties that were going to be left out are most likely to get BET or some other line technology rather than satellite or wireless.

Very difficult to make a case for going with another provider.
Posted by craigbrass over 5 years ago
@Somerset: And that is worse than giving it to BT who only plan to deploy 21CN in all exchanges in Cumbria along with a VERY small sprinkling of FTTC...? No benefit for rural areas again...
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 5 years ago
@craigbrass So tell us what % of premises will get FTTC and FTTP in cumbria?

Do you really think BT is going to simply deploy ADSL2+ across the county?
Posted by New_Londoner over 5 years ago
@timmay
Quote "Yet again it looks like a council has screwed things up for a local company, giving money to the big boys."

It would be interesting whether BT or Rutland employ more people in the county, which has the most assets there, spends the most locally etc.
Posted by Michael_Chare over 5 years ago
I just hope that FTTP on demand will be reasonably priced for those that will only be offered a 2mbps service via dsl.
Posted by craigbrass over 5 years ago
@Andrew: £17m allocated to Cumbria by BDUK is nothing to BT. I have seen the tender documents. It mentions 21CNing the exchanges mainly and a very small amount of FTTC outside the major population areas (Carlisle, Penrith, Kendal, etc). No mention of FTTP. The whole exercise is an elaborate way of giving half a billion to BT without any benefit to those who truly need it.
Posted by c_j_ over 5 years ago
"Making the grants loans instead is one easy way. Hardly any EU rules on that. "

And how do you think the Daily Mail will react when (not if) they find out about that? I know there are lots of theoretical possibilities. Not all are practical.

Posted by craigbrass over 5 years ago
Surely the Daily Mail would be pleased they are LOANING half a billion rather than GIFTING half a billion...?
Posted by fastman over 5 years ago
Craig -- i woul assume that tender request a spec reuqired speed and coverage of intervention area - and it up the respndeers how to deliver that requirement whist meet the specifics set by local Authoity -- stange you make no mention of other bidders only one
Posted by craigbrass over 5 years ago
I only mention BT because they are the likely winners although I am hearing wisper CCC may give it to Fujitsu just because everyone will say it was always destined for BT. For big companies, £17m goes NOWHERE. First of all, an exchange must be 21CNed before it can be FTTCed. 21CN gives benefit to the largest number of people at least cost. £75k subsidy for each exchange to 21CN = £15m. £2m and whatever other funding CCC find to do limited FTTC costing ~£100k per install with long fibre runs. Nobody who needs it is getting anything. Simples.
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