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£363 million of broadband investment will go to England and Scotland
Tuesday 16 August 2011 12:45:09 by John Hunt

The government are to invest £363 million in England and Scotland to enhance the UK's broadband services it has been announced today. The funding comes from £530m that has been set aside for broadband projects in the UK, to be distributed by Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) to councils. England will receive £294.8 million whilst Scotland is set to get £68.8 million, whilst Wales is getting £56.9 million and Northern Ireland £4.4 million.

"Fast broadband is absolutely vital to our economic growth, to delivering public services effectively, and to conducting our everyday lives.

But some areas of the UK are missing out, with many rural and hard-to-reach communities suffering painfully slow internet connections or no coverage at all. We are not prepared to let some parts of our country get left behind in the digital age.

Jeremy Hunt, Culture Secretary

The government's intention is to create the "best super-fast broadband network in Europe by 2015", and also allow everyone to get online at speeds of at least 2Mbps. Private industry is already progressing towards this, with BT looking to get 40% of the country enabled for fibre-to-the-cabinet (FTTC) or fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) broadband by the Summer of 2012, whilst around 2/3rd's of the country is expected to be reached without government assistance.

The funding being made available is based on where it expects the market will fail to deliver next-generation service to enough premises rather than it being based on the number of residents in the county. As such, Greater London has currently been awarded no funding as it is assumed that the private sector will provide suitable coverage here. Many rural areas will see the most help and the Country Land and Business Association (CLA) have praised the government for helping rural areas the most.

"I am delighted the Government recognises that rural areas are missing out on all the benefits broadband brings and that the countryside should not be overlooked. Rural areas are woefully underserved by even an adequate broadband service let alone superfast.

The CLA has argued for eight years that a Public Private Partnership (PPP) should be created to provide the correct level of investment for a superfast broadband infrastructure and today’s announcement by Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt supports this."

William Worsley, (President) CLA

It will now be up to local councils to place the money toward suitable projects to ensure that enough people are given access to next-generation broadband. They may also search for additional funding which may come from their own budgets or from matched funding from the private sector.

The full funding allocation list to each local authority can be found here.

Comments

Posted by alwall over 5 years ago
Link doesn't work http://www.thinkbradband.com/jump.html?type=2&url=http://www.culture.gov.uk/images/publications/BDUK-Funding-Allocation-16-08-11.pdf
Posted by zyborg47 over 5 years ago
Be careful now,allowing everyone to get online at speeds of at least 2Mbps could be too much.

what a pathetic country
Posted by hecatae over 5 years ago
so where is the remaining £105.1 million of funding going?
Posted by mobilebb over 5 years ago
If you actually ignore the headline figures today and total up the English county allocations then most of the money is accounted for. I think they've just confused people a bit by stating a new total for England that appears to exclude the cash investment from earlier pilots'.
Posted by SYM9 over 5 years ago
So how is this distributed by company? Or is the government just dumping £363M of taxpayers money into BT's coffers for BT to charge the taxpayer for using what they have already paid to provide?
Posted by AndrueC over 5 years ago
@SYMB9:"for BT to charge the taxpayer for using what they have already paid to provide" what's that supposed to mean? BT provides broadband where it can based on the same principal as any other business. *If* this money is being given to BT then it would be a radical departure from current policy.
Posted by New_Londoner over 5 years ago
@SYM9
I think you'll find that there are open tenders in each case. Stating the obvious but I doubt you can run a tender for something that already exists!
Posted by craigbrass over 5 years ago
Tenders sadly have to go through OJEU process which, while it was supposed to allow smaller players to compete, generally favours the big boys or incumbent in this case. Cumbria County Council is combining the funds with their public sector network so chances of any speed improvements for rural areas are not looking good...
Posted by Red_Kelt over 5 years ago
Wow, 2mbps.

The rest of the world will be standing back in amazement at our technilogical achievement here!
Posted by Red_Kelt over 5 years ago
It's like announcing with glee and a puffed out chest that Bernard Manning is running for Britain in the 2012 100metres.
Posted by herdwick over 5 years ago
http://j.mp/qFJbDX £40m left to spend.

Does anyone think less than £50 per property is especially useful?
Posted by AndrueC over 5 years ago
@Red_Kelt et al:2Mb/s for every property in the country(*) would indeed be an achievement. Not many countries can boast that. UK broadband might not be superfast but few (if any) countries can beat us on availability even now.

(*)Excluding 'Old Jack's' sheep shelter on top of Ben Nevis :)
Posted by NilSatisOptimum over 5 years ago
I'm still laughing!
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 5 years ago
Generally projects using the money are aiming for 90% + on superfast i.e. >= 25Mbps link speed.

The remainder on 2Mbps

Councils are expected to match fund, and get some private funding to top-up.

Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 5 years ago
Seeing the money being portioned out is good, but the lack of detail on plans as ever is the worry.

With authorities making their own decisions the Fujitsu project is now dead in the water I believe.
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Why is everyone fixated on 2Mbps did you read the article?

'The government's intention is to create the "best super-fast broadband network in Europe by 2015", and also allow everyone to get online at speeds of at least 2Mbps. '


Its "and also" not:-


The government's intention is to create the "best super-fast broadband network in Europe by 2015", and allow everyone to get online at speeds of at least 2Mbps. '

The 2Mbps is the bear minimum everyone knows that isn't "the offering"
Posted by camieabz over 5 years ago
4Mbps ought to be the minimum, given the overhead of current website content. 2Mbps might be fine for e-mail and text-based browsing, but even the sites which are designed to be available to all are content-heavy these days.

However, if on a sub-500Kbps connection, I'm sure 2Mbps will be a great improvment.
Posted by bosie over 5 years ago
Virgin recently pulled out of Westminster citing costs. Inner cities could do with some help too.
Posted by Keef1977 over 5 years ago
Virgin should applly for it and deploy fibre optics to those places that are supposedly more expensive (in other words, bring it to my area!!). With the extra cash, they will can deploy thefibre optics, increase their customer base which = more profits.....

Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Virgin probably aren't in most of the areas listed to any great degree so I can't see them tendering much. The only fibre they deploy is to an optical node the rest is coax (just in case you thought they fibred to your home)
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Also I think one of the requirements it to be able to wholesale whatever you put in, which Virgin don't do (wholesale)
Posted by chrysalis over 5 years ago
rural areas to be ahead by 2015 then. Since VM counts as next gen by this mob then the 10mbit upload will be more rolled out to rural than urban.
Posted by cobbower over 5 years ago
Well like Andrew says " With authorities making their own decisions the Fujitsu project is now dead in the water I believe."

It was a nice dream, but time to wake up.
Posted by cobbower over 5 years ago
Actually, is it me or am I just being cynical that the rural broadband problem has been going around for some time. Each time there is a new plan to solve the problem which dosent materialise only to have yet another plan which also dosen't materialise. All these promises and nothing happens.
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Was never going to happen, the collaboration will remain a PR stunt to try to force down the PIA price. Sounded good, but no money behind it
Posted by wirelesspacman over 5 years ago
So Let's see...

We have one group of muppets who don't know what they are doing (Government) handing out vast sums of money to 2nd group of muppets who don't know what they are doing (BDUK) who hand it over to 3rd group of muppets who don't know what they are doing (local authorities).

The music stops with that 3rd group of muppets, who realise they have to achieve something - and at least perceived risk to them. Thus (after careful tendering etc etc) they conclude it is best to hand over all that is left (after deducting BDUK's fees and their own “handling” costs) to BT.

Job done!
Posted by 21again over 5 years ago
Whoever advised that 2Meg sync was a suitable minimum rate obviously wasn't aware of the fact that you do well to get 83% of that as a realistic throughput without the effect of the BT network and exchange issues at various times of the day, hour and weather factors.

OK it's maybe fine for e-mail but at that speed it's not even fit for web browsing any more because of web-page content compared to four years ago.

Still better to get 2Meg via BT network than nothing at all I suppose :P
Posted by Bob_s2 over 5 years ago
The Fujitsu lead Open Network approach is the best way of increasing competition & improving the rollout. Given the way the government are splitting it up it will though take a lot longer to get it off the ground. The only cost effective way to penetrate the market is to use BT’s ducting anthing else does not make sense

The government’s piecemeal approach with this funding will significantly increase costs and will as with previous schemes pretty much fail to deliver






Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
With respect Bob, nothing has been announced on the Open Network front since that initial story, the fact that it relied heavily on getting 500m from the government and better PIA pricing says to me its finished unless Fuji and going to stump up billions themselves to do it like BT are doing?

It was a bit of a pipe dream back then, a distant memory now.
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Although if they are serious there's nothing stopping them tendoring for each of these areas?
Posted by GMAN99 over 5 years ago
Although if they are serious there's nothing stopping them tendoring for each of these areas?
Posted by themanstan over 5 years ago
PIA pricing is entirely fair, it compares favourably with what France Telecom charges and their regulator hasn't seen fit to revise those prices.
And the fact they wrote to politicians instead of OFCOM shows that they know it's fair...
Posted by Oddball over 5 years ago
Some folks near to the city of London are also suffering from crap speeds. My sister lives in Dulwich and gets less than a meg. Granted she lives in a block of apartments but still.
Posted by Bob_s2 over 5 years ago
Quote "Posted by wirelesspacman 3 days ago
So Let's see...


That sums it up except that there will be four groups involved.

Government
BDUK
Local Councils
ISP/Telcos

Efectively there will be an addional layer as the Local Councils will set upa Quango to manage the scheme (What they manage is a mystery as all they should be doing is putting it out to tender)

They will also probably take on loads of consultants

By the time they cream off their cuts not much is left



Posted by creakycopperline over 5 years ago
2mps that's piss poor, the best broadband in europe by 2015? i doubt we'll be there by 2030.
the way they are carrying on. our government are habitual liers.
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