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30 million adults use the Internet nearly every day according to the ONS
Friday 27 August 2010 15:27:13 by John Hunt

30.1 million adults use the Internet every day or nearly every day according to statistics released today by the Office for National Statistics ONS. Just over a half of these (17.4 million adults) used the Internet to watch television or listen to the radio, a huge increase over the figures from 2006 when the only 6.4 million did these activities. 73% of households had access to the Internet (as also recently reported by Ofcom)and 31 million people purchased goods or services online in the last 12 months. Of these, the most popular purchases were clothes and sporting goods (52%) whilst this figure increased for women (at 57%). Men however favoured purchasing films and music with these making up 48% of purchases. This shows that our population is increasingly aware of the Internet and the benefits that it brings, particularly in cost savings of purchasing goods and services online.

The report collates statistics based on various socio-economic and demographic indicators. Within age, 60% of those over 65 had never used the Internet, comparing with 22% of those aged between 55 and 64. Just 1% of those aged 16 to 24 had not used the Internet. London saw the highest density of Internet usage at 87% of adults. The North East had the lowest at 71%. Under marital status, 92% of single adults had used the Internet, compared with 81% of married and just 32% of widowed. What the figures don't show is the age of the widowed adults which is likely to include more people in the older age groups which could play a factor in this weighting.

Type of employment also swayed Internet usage with 91% of those in managerial of professional occupations having used the Internet whilst 67% in semi-routine and routine occupations. Equally, this was mirrored somewhat by education with 97% of those educated to degree level or higher having used the Internet whilst 45% of those without formal qualifications had. Income also played a roll with 98% of people earning more than £41,600 having used the Internet whilst 69% of those earning less than £10,399 had.

"Since 2006 we have seen a significant increase in the number of people using the Internet, with the number of adults accessing the Internet every day almost doubling to just over 30 million, though the UK is some way off from being completely online. Usage is closely linked with a number of socio-economic and demographic indicators with those less educated and on lower incomes less likely to access the web.

We have also seen changes in the way people connect and in the frequency of connection, with 31 per cent of Internet users connecting via a mobile phone in 2010 compared to 23 per cent in 2009. The use of wi-fi hotspots continued to rise with 2.7 million people (7 per cent of Internet users) used wireless hotspots at locations such as cafes, restaurants, and hotels."

Mark Williams, Office for National Statistics

Comments

Posted by cyberdoyle over 6 years ago
People won't bathe or shower every day if they have to carry water from a well. Until there is ubiquitous, affordable and efficient internet access everywhere there will not be 100% take up. Even very elderly people can use the internet (remote healthcare etc) without using a computer. Once IT works it will be used. Currently 90% of the uk land mass has substandard connectivity. One third of population sub 2meg USC.
Posted by Legolash2o over 6 years ago
well said, I completely agree.
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
cd - land mass figures do not matter, premises do.
Posted by herdwick over 6 years ago
Digital Britain report, which invented the USC, said "More than one in 10 households today cannot enjoy a 2Mbps connection. " - not exactly one third.

Hey Chris, how come "91% of those in managerial of professional occupations having used the Internet" - does it only work in certain people's houses ?

There will not be 100% takeup because there are a lot of people that cannot read, to name but one group that would struggle.

Remote healthcare ? LOL. you can't even email your doc today.
Posted by Legolash2o over 6 years ago
"Remote healthcare ? LOL. you can't even email your doc today."

Bandwidth comes first, then ideas follow. i.e. iPlayer came after 8Mb packages where available.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
Remote Healthcare, not with this government they hate any NHS IT project it wouldn't be canned as it would never get off the ground in the first place. Your not still going on about uk land mass are you? How many times do we have to go over this, chickens, cows and insects have no interest in the internet.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
I can email my doctors surgey to make and cancel appointments and also to request repeat prescripstions, guess that just comes down to which Doctors pratice you are a patient of.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 6 years ago
Phil, 91% of the people in managerial professions are probably accessing it at work. In urban areas. GMan the people looking after the rural areas have a great need for connectivity. BT and ofcom who have all the stats admit now that a third of the country won't get NGA and probably not even the USC.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 6 years ago
You don't need to be able to read to benefit from the internet. Remote monitoring and stuff like that only needs a decent connection. The internet is only a small part of the big picture. Quadplay.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 6 years ago
Until connectivity is ubiquitous the brave new world won't happen. We need everyone to have access at an affordable price. Just like water and electric. They can then pay for whatever they want or need.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
So does 90% of the UK Land mass need broadband because you keep bringing that up
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
^^^ They will in the future when regular TV uses the net. Atleast IMO that will happen.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
So are you saying 90% of the land mass in the UK has houses on it?
Posted by herdwick over 6 years ago
I too can make and cancel appointments online (web) and order repeat prescriptions - you can't email your actual doctor though, can you ?

Stop making crap up , Chris. Where is there published data saying 1/3 won't get the USC. Are you just merging the final third (no NGA) into no USC to promote whatever the hell it is you think should be done ?
Posted by herdwick over 6 years ago
" 91% of the people in managerial professions are probably accessing it at work. In urban areas. "

you are in denial. 88% of socio-economic class AB and 81% of C1 have home internet access (OFCOM). Similarly 83% of 25-34 year olds and 85% of 35-54 year olds have home internet access.

Do you believe all these people are in urban areas ?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"So are you saying 90% of the land mass in the UK has houses on it?"

Opps no and have re-read your arguement with cyberdoyle now. I meant 90% of homes, not land mass. Cant see mount snowdon and the like needing FTTH at its peak anytime soon ;)
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"I too can make and cancel appointments online (web) and order repeat prescriptions - you can't email your actual doctor though, can you ?"

Actually i can but not through being told publically i can but creatively putting my doctors name in front of the generic email address instead. Obviously though they dont like it if you do that and i can understand why, the hypercondriacs would be emailing them a billion times a day if they officially implemented that.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
That's what I mean CB. I don't know why she keeps going on about 90% of the land mass, why deliver services where no-one lives or works?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
Yeah in terms of actual land mass, broadband certainly does NOT need to cover 90%. If cyberdoyle was arguing next gen services like fibre need to be able to reach atleast 90% of homes i may agree. But actual land mass, errr no i dont quite think every other tree trunk needs a RJ45 connector ;) or how about FTTL (Fibre to the Landfill i somehow dont see a big market as people hang around inhaling the methane gas)
Posted by Mr_Fluffy over 6 years ago
herdwick:'Digital Britain report, which invented the USC, said "More than one in 10 households today cannot enjoy a 2Mbps connection. " - not exactly one third.'

It doesn't say less than a third either - it just estimates more than one in 10! There are plenty who might be alleged to have an 8Mbps who do not "enjoy" a 2Mbps equivalent connection because at important times of the day they are denied anything that good due to contention/exchange issues/traffic shaping etcetera, without even taking into account the poor sods with long, noisy lines
Posted by Mr_Fluffy over 6 years ago
My son has only just now reported to me that he can now get a 3g T-Mobile signal on his N900, which is cause for celebration because the 300kbps down and 60kbps up is better than his 8Mbps MaxDSL BT landline connection at busy times of the day. He lives in Aberystwyth, less than 1Km from the exchange and with excellent stats!
Posted by Mr_Fluffy over 6 years ago
Where I live in Bracknell, my stats are worse than my son's, but because I have an ADSL2+ connection with Be, the consistent 15-16Mbps sync allows D/Ls from good servers, like those I use for Linux updates, to proceed at about 1.5MB/s (that's Mega Bytes not Mega bits!)
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@CD
"BT and ofcom who have all the stats admit now that a third of the country won't get NGA and probably not even the USC."

Actually I understand that BT has committed to delivering FTTC/P to around 2/3s of the UK population without public funding, and teh govt. is currently exploring funding options to reach all/some of the remaining 1/3.


contd.

Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
This should not be confused with the USC 2Mb though, as there are plenty of rural locations that get well above that speed - a lot of housing is fairly tightly clustered in villages etc,which can get good speeds if co-located with the exchange.

Obviously there are also some long lines, which get slow/no broadband, but that applies in urban areas too - admnitedly to a lower % of locations.

Contd.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
The big issue is not availability though - if it were then surely you'd get close to 100% take-up in urban areas like London? As mentioned elsewhere, its as much to do with education and perceived need as anything - if you can't read and write its unlikely you'll be buying a computer anytime soon.

And yes, you can go online without using a computer (eg IPTV) but that is not the same thing - it certainly does not have the same economic benefit.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@Cyberdoyle
"Currently 90% of the uk land mass has substandard connectivity. One third of population sub 2meg USC."

According to the latest Ofcom report, only 400k of the 18.2 million broadband connections in 2009 achieved speeds of less than 2Mbps, or approx 2.2%. Not sure where the one third comes from?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"Actually I understand that BT has committed to delivering FTTC/P to around 2/3s of the UK population without public funding"

Incorrect they have not committed to anything they have estimated that 2/3rds figure. Some of the cabinets due to be done soon are only getting done due to others in part funding it, NOT BT. So that statement is tripe start to end. Seriously do you work for BT or in some kind of advertising, you have a habbit of making things sound rosey without telling the full truth.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@CB
SOrry to say you're misinformed on this. The £2.5bn investment has been quoted as reaching an estimated 2/3s of the population and is from BT.

Obviously this doesn't preclude others in the public and private sectors investing too, either to fund additional BT deployment (as you were hinting at in your post), or as free-standing projects. Not an issue, some will ensure reach beyond the 2/3s from BT, some will provide competition within the 2/3s.

Either way it doesn't detract from the 2/3s being funded from BT. Hopefully this clears up your confusion.
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
Committed to any estimated 66% without further funding. Seems easy enough to understand.
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
AS BT say:

Will public sector assistance be required to take super-fast broadband availability in the UK to the final third of the country?

A. BT expects to take fibre to two thirds of UK premises by 2015. The costs increase dramatically once the first two thirds of the country have been enabled. There will be locations where public sector funding will be needed in order to make it commercially viable for super-fast broadband to be provided. We strongly welcome the opportunity to talk with organisations interested in participating in the roll-out of this exciting technology.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"BT expects"

Or like i said thats what they estimate.
there is no commitment to do 2/3rds at all.

quote"There will be locations where public sector funding will be needed"

Again as i said.
CONT
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@New_londoner...

The 2/3rds is what BT are aiming to do, not what they are committed to doing and the money involved is an estimated of cost also.

There are no promises, there cant be a promise of 2.5bn. NOBODY knows what the final cost will be in total until its all done. If for example BT had PROMISED 2.5bn spend and it only costs them 1bn where they gonna spend another 1.5bn to meet their 2.5bn promise huh? I dont spose you thought about things like that in a logical manner though.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@CB
I think you're being pointlessly pedantic on the investment point, can't imagine why? ANyway, I'm sure that the BT team are much better informed than your or I regarding deployment costs for FTTC given they had "reached over 1.5 million households by July 2010 and were passing 100,000 additional premises each week" (source Ofcom).



Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
Contd.

Why are you so negative about the company investing the most to bring next generation broadband to the most people in the UK? WHy not knock those who are not investing, or who are resisting opening up their systems instead?

Strangly many of the people that are the most negative are not themselves proposing to fund investment but are happy to knock the efforts of others, even if they will ultimately benefit. It makes no sense to me to knock something that is positive, will benefit many of us, for no good reason - and without offering a CREDIBLE alternative.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"@CB
I think you're being pointlessly pedantic on the investment point"

NO im correcting your dis-information about promises and commitments on amounts involved, there is no promise or committment or whatever you dream up calling it next....... Everything is an estimate. Im not negative i have previously said well done for BT spending money, im negative though when people make claims they have committed to x figure, which they have NOT.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
BT FTTC is a positive, the moment they or any company want any form of public cash though its no longer a positive, they are a private company. Residents of local community and government shouldnt have to fund BT or anyone in any area..... Not everyone wants the internet, let alone FTTC, so why should those peoples taxes and similar be used.... BT are not the government even if they would like to be and think they can do as they please.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
So lets have the full truth shall we......
YES WELL DONE TO BT for doing FTTC
NO not well done to them for only doing an estimated 2/3rds, and in some of those 2/3rds wanting public money. No not well done to them YET on money spent because NOBODY icluding you know the final amount to congratulate them on. 2.5bn is a estimate so stop trying to promote that its gospel promise like you have in a few news items.
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
Given we don't know the 2/3 how can you say some want public money?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
Sittingbourne exchange was part of the announced two thirds.... To do Iwade cabinets though they wanted public money
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