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Fibre through sewers halts in Bournemouth
Friday 13 August 2010 12:40:54 by John Hunt

Plans to lay fibre through the sewer system in Bournemouth have ground to a halt after Wessex Water refused to allow i3 Fibrecity (H2O Networks) to deploy using their patented FS System. Fibre run through existing ducting like sewers makes it cheaper to run the cables as there is less requirement to dig up roads to install the infrastructure. Once deployed, customers in the area can then connect up to a full fibre-to-the-home network which grants faster broadband and gives the option for new innovative technologies to be delivered over the fibre connection.

Wessex Water cited contractual issues and said that the technology methodology didn't work for them. i3 had trialled the system using the sewers between Bournemouth town hall and the nearby BIC convention centre, but they were not allowed to continue installing through the sewers after this. Wessex Water did indicate that they would not rule out future proposals for deploying fibre in the sewers however. Fibrecity however saw things slightly differently.

"It is our opinion that Wessex Water has been short sighted in putting commercial demands above the opportunity to provide a low cost fibre optic network that will deliver superfast broadband to their own customers. Citing technical issues as a reason is misleading in respect to the viability of the i3 Group's FS System, a patented method of laying fibre in ready made ducts including sewer pipes. When we announced Fibrecity Bournemouth, it was with the permission of Wessex Water to utilise the pipes where appropriate, therefore keeping disruption to residents and businesses to a minimum. We had completed successful trials and due diligence, and planned to move on to delivery on a commercial basis.

During the rollout, contractual issues have meant that we have had to find alternative means to deliver Fibrecity Bournemouth. As our technology uses three low cost methodologies, we have been able to avoid the rollout coming to a halt, and all works being carried out in Bournemouth are with the consent of Bournemouth Borough Council, having gone through the necessary planning routes.

It is disappointing that Wessex Water's approach to this matter and lack of support for its own customers has been responsible for any delays of the network rollout to date. We are glad to report that other water authorities see the win win that the FS System enables - it helps with the management and repair of the sewer pipes, it generates revenue for the water company as i3 Group pays to have access to the pipes, and of course the fact that the water company's customers will benefit from having access to a super fast fibre to the home network."

i3 Group statement

This is not the end for Fibrecity however as they have continued to install in the area using other methods. The company also continues rollout using Sewers in other areas like Dundee and has plans to add further cities in the next 12 months which include Derby, Halton, Nottingham, Plymouth, and York. They have their eye on reaching more than a million UK homes and businesses over the next four years.

Comments

Posted by otester over 6 years ago
Everyone boycott Wessex water and go take a dump at their HQ!
Posted by cyberdoyle over 6 years ago
Oh dear, another utility who just can't grasp joined up thinking. I hope Fibrecity keeps at it and finds a way round the problem, I am sure it will. I also hope Big Society smashes all the stupid rules and regulations stopping innovation in this country. Its time to take action and roll out the fibre, in the easiest and cheapest ways to bring our digital economy back into the eNdGAme.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
Fibre through sewers runs into ....
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
Trouble.... :)

Oh dear, what exactly was the issue it doesn't really make it clear it just sounds like they didn't want them messing around in their pipes.
Posted by jrawle over 6 years ago
@otester: given than water companies are the last remaining true utility monopolies, what are people in the Wessex area supposed to do? Go without water?
Posted by herdwick over 6 years ago
I don't see how having anything in a sewer pipe can ever benefit the operator. I say this having been involved in laying and repairing sewers and winching CCTV sleds through them.

Fibrecity still looks like a productive PR machine bolted onto a wild west stagecoach.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
@herdwick, I don't know either but I assumed they'd be paying the water company some sort of rent?
Posted by herdwick over 6 years ago
looks that way :-

" it generates revenue for the water company as i3 Group pays to have access to the pipes "
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
A real shame for i3 and residents, once again another monopoly making it difficult for innovators :(
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
hence the complete silence from Fibrecity since their latest PR spurt.
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
...that will deliver superfast broadband to their own customers.

Clutching at straws trying to link their business with WW customers.
Posted by james_2010 over 6 years ago
I live in BH11 and was one of the first customers to be connected by fibre-optic cabling to the outside of my home. I don't believe that it makes a difference whether the cable is through the sewers or micro-trenched, Fibrecity are making Bournemouth one of the first fibre-cities in the UK, that's the main point! I now have a fantastic service with the fibre giving me speeds of around 94Mbps - thanks to Fibreband
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
Seems a bit rich to blame Wessex Water for delays to the deployment. Presumably they've decided that it doesn't make sense to them, surely it is up to i3 to make the offer compelling, or shoulder the blame if they can't?

Difficult to see i3 deploying anywhere else via the Wessex Water network after this.
Posted by Mitchy_mitch over 6 years ago
I can only assume that the main reason they have stopped this is due to the maintenance that is required within the sewers. DO we know if they are using the rainwater drains, or the foul water drains? It makes a big difference i guess. If using the foul, the amount of maintenance that would be required cleaning what they call the rags from the cabling would be an endless task. If not cleared regularly, fibre breaks could be common within the sewers.
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
Really james? I didn't think any of these fibre rollouts actually connected to the Internet, maybe I'm thinking of h2o
Posted by GMAN99 over 6 years ago
Oh they are one of the same...
Posted by skincomb10 over 6 years ago
I hope they come to Northwich, Cheshire one day....we could do with decent fibre services here as the cable operators never touched us.......consequently ntl, now virgin cabled Halton (I hear that fibrecity are looking to lay fibre here) only about 10 miles away.
I think Wessex Water should'nt be so short sited, seeing as it may benefit them!!
Posted by skincomb10 over 6 years ago
Take Hong Kong as an example. HKBN (City Telecom) made deal with the MTR underground to provide them with free 100mb fibre broadband on their trains (For IPTV) and also in station. In Turn MTR let them us their tunnels to run the fibre. You can get 100mb or even 1gb broadband.
For about £22 for 100mb and about £50 for 1gb
Mobile services work great too. not like londons underground!!
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
How will it benefit WW?
Posted by otester over 6 years ago
@jrawle

They won't let us all die!
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"Difficult to see i3 deploying anywhere else via the Wessex Water network after this."

Yeah cos Wessex Water own the whole countrys sewer and water networks dont they <rolleyes, sarcasm off>
Posted by CaptainHulaHoop over 6 years ago
You are an idiot CB, where does that comment mention the whole country.
Posted by CaptainHulaHoop over 6 years ago
the only benefit to WW from this would be rent paid. but as others have said, having a mini duct in the drain or sewer would probably cause extra maintenance requirements and problems, increasing their costs, i assume i3 didn't want to pay the extra costs. if its rainwater drains, there are enough problema with them not working properly in heavy sudden downpours, and if in sewers some properties get enough problems with blockages without reducing the effective size of their sewer.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
^^^ Having to resort to name calling without reading the statement made very carefully...... Priceless. Maybe "deploying anywhere else" means something different to you.
Wessex water is only a regional water company, they wont even have to speak to them if they wish to develop outside of a Wessex water region..... OR... "anywhere else".

Oh and i think you will find i3 dont need to use ducts either, (its armoured cable). Good try at shouting though <pat>.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
"Difficult to see i3 deploying anywhere else via the Wessex Water network after this."

Why limit it to Wessex Water? If H2O's cost-driven business model doesn't provide enough extra dosh to make a few quid for *both* parties, the business model is doomed.

If this wasn't obvious to both parties at the time the "deal" was signed, had someone not been paying enough attention?

Something about "watertight contracts" needs to be said here. Over to you...
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@CB "Difficult to see i3 deploying anywhere else via the Wessex Water network after this."

Yeah cos Wessex Water own the whole countrys sewer and water networks dont they <rolleyes, sarcasm off> "

You're right, they don't cover the whole country, equally they are not confined to Bournemouth either but stretch to Bristol, Taunton, Weymouth etc.

Comment was referring to the rest of the Wessex Water area, sorry if that was unclear to anyone.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
No problem New_Londoner, i think its clear what you were trying to say, pointed it out see you could correct it/be clear as you now have done :) Shame i even had to explain it to another poster. Oh and i agree with you in a Wessex Water area they are not likely to be able to roll out further. Hopefully though they can forward a case other water companies find acceptable and carry on their roll out in those areas. Its been slow going but the few that have the service seem happy.
Posted by KarlAustin over 6 years ago
"Citing technical issues as a reason is misleading in respect to the viability of the i3 Group's FS System, a patented method of laying fibre in ready made ducts including sewer pipes" - I like how people twist things, just because it has a patent doesn't mean it is safe or viable with respect to what the water company demands. I'm sure it is safe, but suggesting because it is patented it is perfect is just nonsense. I can patent something as daft as I want as long as no one else has thought of it before.
Posted by Faplock over 6 years ago
Quote" DO we know if they are using the rainwater drains, or the foul water drains?"

It's the sewers according to the initial report. And Bournemouth is a strange place as far as water is concerned: the water is delivered by Bournemouth and West Hampshire Water while Wessex water takes away the waste. Apart from that Wessex Water appears to be a Bristol company, at least, that's where the bills come from.
Posted by jamesajohnson over 6 years ago
Isn't it best to use sewers only for sewerage and put fibre-optics in dedicated service ducts. Imagine the complaints and implications if a sewer was blocked and in clearing it the fibre-optic cables were severed !! You wouldn't afterall want your gas supplied up your water pipe would you !!
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/8332491.Fibrecity_chaos_for_Bournemouth_residents/
Posted by KarlAustin over 6 years ago
There's a lot of fibre in the London sewers that a lot of ISPs use - Installed and maintained by Geo UK :) Dedicated ducts means being accessible to anyone else digging up the same bit of road and wreaking havoc with your cables - If they put a JCB through the sewers then there's some major problems.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@whatever2 Great link, I hope the residents moaning are not maoning at i3 about roads being dug up. Pretty clear from that link who is likely the bad guy in it all. i3 make an explanation of what has happened, Wessex Water wimping out of explaining anything and a spineless council just passing blame the other 2 companies entirely. Pretty typical and exactly what i expected when i started reading the link.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@KarlAustin Agreed if idiot workman go through a sewer enough not only to damage it, but also ducting for any cabling that may be down there the ramifications of doing that can be far more serious than a few people losing internet access. Like water company having to turn off water while repairs are done... Damage like that is pretty rare.
Shoved in a conventional duct a foot or so under the road or pavement though and any idiot can easily go through it.
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
dunno CB... here's a pic of their handy work on pavements

http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/8332491.Fibrecity_chaos_for_Bournemouth_residents/

seeing as my road wouldn't allow virgin to dig up the pavements i don't think they'd be too happy about that scar either.
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
w2 - after it's filled it won't be noticed after a few months. Wonder why it's not straight.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@whatever2 Looking at how uneven that particular pavement is (or maybe its the photograph that gives that impression) I think residents have alot more to complain about to the council rather than worrying about a cable being installed. The trouble in cases like this is the short sighted will blame i3 for any inconvenience caused. Where as that hole probably wouldnt of even needed digging if the water company concerned didnt say no to them. The council and i3 with regards to work like in the photo now have their hands tied as thats the only way to install.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@somerset, yeah the work does look a bit wonky, then again so does the entire pavement LOL
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
wonder why it's not straight or down the side of the kerb or the walls...

either way, there will be quite a few roads who don't wish to see that sort of effort in bournemouth
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
How deep is the duct being buried? CB righly points out that putting it depper reduces the risk of accidental damage, is this a very thin but deep trench or is it put just below the surface?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
Looking at the photo (the best i can) the equipment being used (see the background workman) looks very similar to what Telewest used at my prior address many years ago, which would mean the cabling is about 1-2 feet deep.
Its a shame really i3 are probably going to get complaints about inconvenience caused when the company itself didnt want to install like they are now having to do :(
Posted by Somerset over 6 years ago
This shows trenching into a pavement. How does the connection from the house get to the sewer?
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@Somerset
I think they use FTTC - Fibre to the Cra99er

;-)
Posted by kijoma over 6 years ago
re :- "Take Hong Kong as an example. .......... You can get 100mb or even 1gb broadband.
For about £22 for 100mb" , then its wise to find out how much bandwidth Hong Kong has to the US etc... An informed figure is somewhat less than 1 gigabit so a fast local pipe isn't as great as it seems. I am sure the same problem will occur over here. FTTC to houses and a limited backhaul capacity to the exchange.. looks good on paper though!
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
CB... from what i've read, that goes down a trench as well... and one source said the fibre exits at the top of the road... so each pavement would have that effort down it.

from all the gloss and pr, it don't look like an effort backing their identity up... fibre optics, and a line that a 2 year old child could make neater with crayons.

the 'rollout' seems to have been more of a pilot.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"This shows trenching into a pavement. How does the connection from the house get to the sewer? "

Er it obviously wouldnt now as Wessex Water said no.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@whatever2 Well the fibre would have to have an entry and exit point somewhere, you dont just bury cable and connect it to nothing.
Without seeing that street its hard to say why it has been done so wonky, it could be poor workmanship or it could be its had to be a little drunk like in appearance to match/miss whatever else may be burried under there. Either way i dont see how i3 deserve the blame for having to dig up streets because a water company said no to allowing what they actually wanted to do.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
"How does the connection from the house get to the sewer? "

Like many things with H2O, there's never really been much detail. You have to make a best guess. My best guess is that the vast majority of the length of fibre stuff in Bournemouth and elswhere is in pavement trenches and there are only a relatively small number of places where the pavement fibre connects to longer-distance sewer fibre. Pretty much as whatever2 said, basically.

"don't see how i3 deserve the blame"

Don't promise unless you can deliver?
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
CB... i think those trenches would be there even if the WW deal had gone through. For a start i cant see them picking up a port to the sewer for every single house, because that would require getting into the sewer every few yards... my reading of it is they use the sewer to get to the head of the street, the trench down both sides, then trench into the house.

i'd love 100mpbs at work and home, but sadly this company have never quite come up with the reality gap between life and their PR.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
Another water connection: "Fibrecity Holdings plans to roll out water meters to households, starting with Bournemouth, via its Fibre to the Home (FTTH) connections which will allow the collection of real time data by the water companies."

I wonder where that stands now.

FibreCity Holdings, H2O, i3, OpenCity. I do apologise if I got any names muxed ip, but they all seem to lead back to the same place.

http://www.h2onetworksdarkfibre.com/latest-news.php?n=fibrecity-will-install-water-meters-as-it-rolls-out-its-fibre-to-the-home-connections
Posted by charliev195 over 6 years ago
As a resident of Bournemouth, Fibrecity are doing a very good job with as little disruption as possible. If it wasn't for the Council being flexible in giving the permissions to Fibrecity to dig up the pavements and roads, then the fibre network would have gone nowhere. The only loosers are Wessex Water who are loosing extra revenue because of the shortsightedness, and if I was a shareholder I would be asking questions about this.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
"If it wasn't for the Council being flexible in giving the permissions to Fibrecity to dig up the pavements and roads"

I'm not sure that part of the argument holds water. I was under the impression that any licenced telco with "code powers" granted (by Ofcom?) is legally allowed to dig up roads and pavements (or pay other people to do it), largely regardless of the council.

Two years ago, with the Fibrecity PR machine already in full progress, H2O did not yet have "code powers".

http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/3650-bournemouth-residents-asked-to-indicate-if-they-want-fibre-installed.html
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
quote"
"don't see how i3 deserve the blame"

Don't promise unless you can deliver?"

Err but they are delivering even without Wessex Water who initially agreed i3 could use their sewer pipes.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
"they are delivering even without Wessex Water"

For how long? There's no technical issue to stop their continued delivery, but there is a commercial one. Their business model is (was?) supposed to provide a uniquely low cost per connection to ensure high takeup. A major part of this was their patented method of putting fibres down sewers (read the patent, it's not rocket science).

No access to sewers means costs go up to be presumably the same as any other outfit digging up roads. IE maybe not economically viable for the mass market.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
^^^ Er so what would you have them do??? First you say "dont promise unless you can deliver", which regardless they are delivering. Now when they do deliver you moan about the business model! No organisation is perfect and i dont see how attacking a companies business model or way of doing things is productive especially when its not even their fault in that specific area of the country they cant install using their original idea.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
Id personally love their service in my area and would be happy to pay them higher costs involved to deliver it or not. I dont see what they have done wrong or why anyone would attack the company for making good their promises to an area to deliver even if it means spending more. Well done to them for still ploughing on, rather than cry about cost (like some would, and no i wont mention names).
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
the trouble is, they may not be delivering... we'll have to see how this decision affects their product.

certainly it's become apparent that the rollout wasn't a rollout and more of a beta test.

the main problem with their approach is they ae very good at PR, and lack actual substance. It's now down to them to come up with that.

It would be great to have the product, even at a higher cost... but customers need to actually know what that is.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
They are delivering the story clearly states
"This is not the end for Fibrecity however as they have continued to install in the area using other methods. The company also continues rollout using Sewers in other areas like Dundee and has plans to add further cities in the next 12 months which include Derby, Halton, Nottingham, Plymouth, and York."
Id say that is actual substance.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
@Cb "The company also continues rollout using Sewers in other areas like Dundee and has plans to add further cities in the next 12 months which include Derby, Halton, Nottingham, Plymouth, and York."

Fair point although some previous posts have highlighted the gap between announcement and activity, so I guess the acid test will be to see if / when these deployments start.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
They had previosly mentioned several locations in the Wessex Water area (I think Bristol, others), interesting to see what happens with these. Bristol would be an unlikely choice anyway given the long-term presence of cable.
Posted by CaptainHulaHoop over 6 years ago
CB - sorry, was having a rubbish day and in a bad mood and mis read your post..
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@New_Londoner i think that statement in the story is accurate, areas like Dundee (certainly Scotland) is where they first started out before they even touched Bournemouth.... Nottingham likewise they have been looking at for a while, i think that deal is as good as done. Personally if i were them id look at areas with poor coverage from BT and Virgin with no LLU either, etc, find pockets with a resonable user base and then try to get my product in those areas and dominate those areas in the market. Grow steadily over the coming years then use financial might to expand further.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@ CaptainHulaHoop No problem or appology needed, we all have bad days.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
"areas like Dundee (certainly Scotland) is where they first started out before they even touched Bournemouth."

There is an unofficial Fibrecity forum and it has an unofficial coverage map: http://www.fibreforum.co.uk/?page=maps

Soemthing not afaik reported yet on AG/TB is that in July i3/H2O/etc appear to have signed a £M+ deal with Fujitsu for Fujitsu to do the streetworks.
"Fujitsu’s first involvement will come this month when it begins to roll-out the fibre optic network to Dundee’s 68,000 homes."
http://www.fibreforum.co.uk/wordpress/?p=82

Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
"They are delivering..."

No it doesn't. And their delivery so far has been far short of their published intentions.

All it says is they have avoided it coming to a halt. Not the same thing.

Don't read into that this is some massive rollout that's still on track. It's never been massive, or really a rollout, and it's dubious without any facts or figures what they will be continuing to deliver.

the area highlighted on http://www.fibreforum.co.uk/?page=maps is tiny, and one side of that road is industrial units, so you can say that residential installations are 1/2 that area.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
Scotland is where they started out, initially as a test/trial and to businesses only if i remember rightly. This site did cover it but i cant find the news item :(
They are delivering to the area/s they promised, all other areas they mention it is clear is negotiation only.
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
"They are delivering to the area/s they promised"

That's your opinion, as yet largely unsupported by a visible customer base, unsupported by hard facts from i3/H2O.

At one time, similar claims could have been made by SSE Telecom for the "full commercial rollout" of their powerline broadband trials.

One of the sad things about the i3/H20 coverage is that it is actually distracting from the efforts of other perhaps more realistic FTTP outfits who have not been getting as much press coverage even though they are probably just as deserving. Nice to see some coverage today though :)
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
Correction: At one time, similar claims WERE made by SSE Telecom ...
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
i3/fibrecity/H2O networks have never claimed FULL commercial rollout, its always been specific areas only they have targetted AFAIK
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
yes, but have they actually delivered a commercial rollout in those targeted areas?

it would seem so far that they have bound their offerings to certain circumstances at best.

Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
^^ Every provider only has services available if in areas it meets a defined set of circumstances. Thats why Virgin and BT FTTC doesnt have 100% coverage either. i3 have never had the aim to roll out in mass scale (mass when compared to the big players in the market) so i dont understand what you are expecting from them. They are a small provider aiming to deliver to relatively small areas of the market.
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
what like 3 roads?
Posted by c_j_ over 6 years ago
CARPETBURN said
"They are a small provider aiming to deliver to relatively small areas of the market. "

In May, i3/H2O said "more than a million homes in the next four years".

So, CB, define "relatively small". Small company (or group of companies), definitely. Million premises passed? Is that a small claim?

Back in Feb, Fibrecity announced that Vispa were on their ISP list. Let's hope the recently announced Fujitsu deal gets further than Vispa's did (announced 24 Feb, vanished by 1 March).
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
^^^ Thats pathetic now......... I could link to stories back in 2008 from the likes of BT that claimed they would give us all fibre by the end of 08........ Companies often state what they would like to do but dont deliver down the line..... Seriously if thats the best bashing you can do on them id give up right now.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@whatever2...... They are continuing to roll out the product, they cant do it over night. Also considering the sewer deal has fallen through have you ever thought they couldnt go shoving wires down there until wessex water agreed? Which in the end as we all know now they didnt. I say well done to i3 for still slugging away now matter how quick or slow things get done. I dont understand what your point is, if they starting digging and doing the whole country tomorrow you would still find complaint.
Posted by MrFell over 6 years ago
Shame this has ground to a halt - it would have been one example of how things can move forward. Hope things continue to progress however, down in Bournmouth and elswhere.
Posted by RedOnRed over 6 years ago
A proposal like this was always going to end up in the shit.
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
CB

I don't think you get it. The didn't achieve their existing goals, so what basis have you for thinking they will achieve yours?

Companies often state, but don't deliver... Yep, that's again what has happened here. So what's wrong with pointing that out when there is so much hype.

They aren't continuing per se, they are saying the project hasn't stopped. Not the same thing.

We'll have to see what happens, i'll wager good money i won't be seeing 100mpbs at home or work for a good long while though.
Posted by AWM_Mars over 6 years ago
Some of you missed that sewers connect to virutally every property in this country. Albeit, I wouldn't want the fibre coming out of my toilet :¬)

I suspect that either:
a) Wessex Water wanted a big portion of the pie, perhaps portraying themselves as a Boradband dealer.
b) The fibre optics cable, small as it maybe, could cause localised blockages. Given the choice between a backed up toilet or fibre cable... where is the plug to plug it in? In the cistern?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
@whatever2 theres nothing wrong with pointing out companies often dont deliver... The key word being companies, so why you are giving just this one a hard time still is hard to understand. I imagine every supplier the world over has made plans and promises, but not always delivered, so i dont understand why you are moaning... Still. They are clearly continuing to try to provide, they aint digging pavements up because they are bored.
Posted by New_Londoner over 6 years ago
Having looked into the microtrenches mentioned in the comments above (as in researched, not peered into), they appear to be only a matter of a few inches deep.

What are the implications for service reliability being a couple of seconds away from the JCB, pnuematic drill etc?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 6 years ago
Virgin cables are also only inches deep (as i pointed out 1-2 feet) SOME BT cables likewise are only at similar depth. Its not uncommon, and i agree not ideal and does mean cables can be damaged by other workman etc more easily. I dunno why ALL comms companies bury cable in shallow trenches, i can only assume its cost related and the cheapest way to do it.
Posted by whatever2 over 6 years ago
CB, i think you'll find i'm pretty fair across the board at criticism of companies that are PR over substance.
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