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Rutland Telecom to enable Welsh notspot of Erbistock
Wednesday 14 April 2010 14:14:12 by Sebastien Lahtinen

Following the official launch of the next-generation broadband services in Lyddington this afternoon, Rutland Telecom has announced similar plans to enable the village of Erbistock close to the Welsh-English border, bringing 'up to 40 meg' speeds to a rural area where many people currently receive no broadband services at all.

"Rutland Telecom is encouraging and assisting rural communities to explore ways of raising the necessary capital such as looking at partnerships or joint ventures, which will ensure local investors get a financially attractive and acceptable rate of return. Its financial model takes into account potential population sign up and service charges and can demonstrate not only the investment required but a rate of return to be enjoyed by those willing to take part. Over the past few months we have been in discussion with several groups outside of Rutland who have all expressed interest in what we have achieved here.

This will be a joint venture between Rutland Telecom and a local group of investors.  They will use the higher speeds delivered by the Next Generation Broadband service to assist with their rural commercial office development. It will also allow them to benefit the local community by providing a service in that area."

Mark Melluish, Rutland Telecom

Map of Erbistock Notspot - from broadband-notspot.org.uk
Map of Erbistock (Wales) notspot; Map data © Google & TeleAtlas 2010.

The plans by Rutland Telecom are likely to be welcomed by the Conservative Party who believes that private companies are capable of delivering next generation broadband to the 'final third' without government funding being made available immediately. Whether this model will be suitable for all rural areas however, will remain to be seen, but these announcements are certainly welcome news to rural broadband campaigners.

Comments

Posted by kamelion over 5 years ago
I like how BT, despite having no prior interest said "BT said it was "delighted to help Rutland Telecom" although it added that it hoped it would allow other service providers access to its new network. "

I would tell them where to go.
Posted by martins over 5 years ago
They may have to, as I very much doubt Lyddington is making any money with 40 subscribers.

Also: "For the first time in UK telecommunications history the telephone lines of customers are completely cut off from the local BT exchange," said Rutland Telecom director Mark Melluish.

Err no, they're about 10 years after the first people to do this when Fibrenet used external cabinets for their LLU venture, and about 2-3 after the big LLU operators did their sub-loop unbundling trials.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 5 years ago
@Kamelion BT like to take credit for everyones work, i thought that was clear by now.
Well done to Rutland Telecom for bringing not only broadband but fast broadband to a part of the country the bigger boys once again ignored.
Posted by Guest_Again over 5 years ago
Welcome to the 21st century!

Isn't BT so kind!?

Next thing you know they put in FTTSC (Fibre To The Scottish Cabinets) - Right after Scotland wins the world cup... :-D
Posted by mikeblogs over 5 years ago
2 down and circa 19,998 to go! Go Rutland! Brillant but, this private sector will take until 2112.
Posted by chrysalis over 5 years ago
The problem the government has is inner city notspots, they getting no focus and publicity.
Posted by Somerset over 5 years ago
BT Wholesale provided the fibre link, what's the problem?
Posted by kamelion over 5 years ago
BT openreach supplied the fibre link somerset, BT had no interest in supplying fast broadband to the village.
Posted by kamelion over 5 years ago
And that was only after they had OFCOM sort it out.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 5 years ago
quote"BT Wholesale provided the fibre link, what's the problem?"

Maybe the BT organisation next time can do a complete job and hook people up..... Ah thats the problem, they dont.
Posted by Somerset over 5 years ago
BT don't because ISPs like TalkTalk, O2 etc. don't want them to (yet).
Posted by Somerset over 5 years ago
What's the figures for a cabinet with eg. 50 or 100 customers? Cost of link, cabinet, rental etc.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 5 years ago
quote"BT don't because ISPs like TalkTalk, O2 etc. don't want them to (yet)."

What are you on about its nothing to do with other companies why BT didnt provide a retail product to customers in that area.
BT had no interest in giving them any type of broadband if they did it would had been done years before O2 and TalkTalk were even in the broadband market.
Posted by seb (Favicon staff member) over 5 years ago
I'm sure the residents care more about getting fast broadband than who provides it.
Posted by Somerset over 5 years ago
Isn't BT Openreach rollout dependant on where the ISPs see their customers buying it?
Posted by docmel53 over 5 years ago
quote "Err no, they're about 10 years after the first people to do this when Fibrenet etc.. ."

The Fibrenet cabinet network was NOT subloop but 'distant LLU' linked back to the exchange - the cabinets had to be as close as they could to the exchange. They still had problems delivering high speeds to customers because of distance limitations.

Posted by docmel53 over 5 years ago
Subloop Unbundling is tapping into the copper network closer to the customer, usually via the PCP.

There are a number of Operators who have and are still still trialling SLU - and Rutland Telecom made no pretence of that - it was mentioned in one of the opening remarks in Lyddington. The Rutland Telecom service actually commenced last October, but RT have waited until everything was running ok before making the launch announcement.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 5 years ago
quote"Isn't BT Openreach rollout dependant on where the ISPs see their customers buying it?"

What are you on about again? This area never had any broadband service, so they would be able to assess anyone buying it to begin with to see if it was worth updating to FTTC.
Posted by Somerset over 5 years ago
FTTC seems to be being rolled out by exchange areas rather than individual cabinets. And then where the ISPs see the largest number of customers signing up. Which currently rules out cabinets with 50 lines.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 5 years ago
^^^ Which defeats the purpose of the 50p tax we were going to have.
Posted by Dixinormous over 5 years ago
The 50p levy is nothing at all to do with the commercial rollout phases. Use of the 50p would not be a commercial rollout and plans would be subject to approval before funding could be provided.

As far as I know the 50p has been abandoned anyway.
Posted by mikeblogs over 5 years ago
Why is there a 10GB allowance? and what this £75 for a phone line, is that to cover the ATA cost?

Posted by CARPETBURN over 5 years ago
quote"The 50p levy is nothing at all to do with the commercial rollout phases."

This area wasnt listed for commercial roll out

quote"As far as I know the 50p has been abandoned anyway."

Wrong again, put on hold then rushed through like the DEB was no doubt if Brown gets back in.
Posted by wirelesspacman over 5 years ago
@ mikeblogs - I would guess that the 10GB allowance and £75 for a phone line is to make the service long term viable, and to try and recoup costs where they are able to.
Posted by herdwick over 5 years ago
I wonder why they borrow money off locals rather than something more conventional. I can see it helps with community buy-in but if there is no community or nobody with spare cash it limits the usefulness of the model.
Posted by Groovehound over 4 years ago
Knowing this exact area intimately, it would be interesting to know the exact level of demand for (fast) broadband, and the distribution between home and small business, etc. This is a very rural area... see the point in the article about "suitable for all rural areas".
Posted by AlconburyTelecom over 3 years ago
What happened in Erbistock - did it get FTTC?
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