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Fibre for some Hull residents
Friday 31 July 2009 16:18:29 by Andrew Ferguson

The Hull area where KCOM has significant market power as the sole fixed line broadband supplier may be seeing a degree of competition and that from a provider aiming to install 100Mbps symmetric solutions to homes.

As part of its NextGenUs strategic partnership Fibrestream are close to starting roll-out of a fibre solution to the flats on the Great Thornton estate in Hull, the solution is meant to be an open access model, meaning that Fibrestream will build the network and then allow for a fee communications providers to provide services like HDTV and internet access over it. Interesting their website does accept that in a case of market failure to ensure the network is not left in the ground as just dark fibre they may have to step in as a retail provider.

Fibrestream are not just looking at the Hull area but are actively looking to gauge the level of interest from other parts of the UK and has a dedicated page detailing how to get in touch with them.

Once the first phase has been completed the aim is to get possible EU funding to help expand the network to the rest of the estate and then further areas across Hull.

Comments

Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
Strongly backs up what I'm saying - KCom make BT look like angels, so there's a far lower barrier of infrastructure to overcome and thus it's commercially viable for a FTTH provider to step in.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
Fibrestream rocks, they helped us run fibre to the farm in rural Lancashire, power to the people! go go go, fibre for everyone and a truly digitalbritain, helping us to compete in the global village and make the UK great again.
Posted by otester over 7 years ago
@cyberdoyle

How much was the cost to install that + cost pcm?
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
it cost £247 per end user for kit, (lighting both ends) and under £1 a metre for the fibre. We dug it in ourselves, but we had a quote for £2.75 for a contractor to do it for us. We just hired the diggers and drivers. Cost of running the fibre is a bit of electric. On private land between farms, so no rent. Backhaul is from wireless. Not coupled up to BT fat pipe,as £76k is a bit pricey for a few rurals.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
If we can get a closer feed we will dig to that. cont: If govt open up the access to BT fibre running past us, or fibre to the kerb comes close then we get our next gen... all we did was prove it isn't rocket science, it isn't expensive, and if two farmers can do it then anyone can. just look on youtube, wennetvideo the vids there show it being done.
Posted by otester over 7 years ago
@cyberdole

So you just link two farms? (sorry if I misunderstood)

What is the actual internet connection?
Posted by FibreGuy over 7 years ago
Thanks for the coverage Andrew and CyberDoyle too - that was a fun day in May http://www.fibrestream.co.uk/2009/05/12/community-interest-ftth/ :)

FibreStream is particularly concerned with building and operating Open Access FttH in areas of social or geographic digital exclusion.

Of course in a global context that means everywhere under 100Mbps symmetric
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
Cyberdoyle - So ignoring most of the major costs for laying fibre, you can do it "cheaply"*..and you don't mention the grade of fibre, the cost of the equipment or much more.

(*£247 alone is years and years of profit, utterly impossible to justify for any company)
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
Dawn, the cost of the kit was £247. the cost of a router is probably less, but this kit can deliver gigs. one day. when we get to a fat pipe. And we had to dig our fibre in, BT already own the ducts and poles so they can do it cheaply too. We used 12 core armoured cable fibre optic. £247 is cheap for a reliable connection. IMHO.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
otester, we link two other properties from a farm with lit fibre optic. The feed to the farm is wireless from Arqiva mast. We do this because we have no adsl in our area. We couldn't hit the two properties with wireless - no line of sight, so we ran fibre. we are a notspot who thanks to fibrestream and others are now a JFDI gotspot.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
and anyway, this post is supposed to be about Hull, who in a much larger way are doing the same thing, laying and lighting fibre, because we know this is our future we are building. Fibrestream help anyone, big or small, and they don't come smaller than us! Anyone who wants to do it CANDO.
Posted by Dixinormous over 7 years ago
Anyone know if this is PON or PtP network?
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
Cyberdoyle - Digging up the streets is massively expensive, both in work time and paying the councils... and "12 core" is not a measure of quality.

£247 might be "cheap", but it's not economically viable. You've picked an awfully expensive way of distributing a slow wireless connection, is all.

And it's /only/ viable in Hull because of the mess KCom make.
Posted by herdwick over 7 years ago
" an open access model, meaning that Fibrestream will build the network and then allow for a fee communications providers to provide services"

have *any* of these ever worked and not had to do their own retail ?

Its a PtP using those "McDonalds straw" bundled tubes AFAIK - a Scottish company does them.
Posted by herdwick over 7 years ago
cyberdoyle economics are completely atypical. I've been watching two contractors lay several hundred metres of ducting for BT down a rural roadside and they spent over three weeks - two men, traffic lights, digger, compressor, small tipper truck, van - go figure. You might do £2.50/metre mole ploughing across your own and a mates pasture land but would I lay money that cyberdoyle and the like would be wanting wayleave agreements and compensation if a 3rd party wanted to cross the same land. The legal fees would exceed £2.50/metre alone.
Posted by cyberdoyle over 7 years ago
Dawn, we have done the best we can, if we didn't do that we would have no broadband at all. Broadband is now a utility. We can live without other things in rural areas, but nowadays we need access to the internet just like you do. Fibrestream helped us unlike BT, and 1 strand of our 12 core can carry the entire uk internet traffic if it had to, what quality it registers I have no idea, but hey, it works. It got two homes online who would otherwise have had no connection, and it worked out cheaper than any other solution.
Posted by Dawn_Falcon over 7 years ago
I'm with herdwick on this one. The economics are atypical and don't scale.

And sorry, again, carrying capacity is not a measure of fibre /quality/.
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