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Ofcom grants H2O Networks street works powers
Wednesday 03 September 2008 10:48:10 by Andrew Ferguson

While the H2O Networks fibre via the sewer scheme reduces the amount of digging and work involved in rolling out a fibre network, it still requires some ducting to hook up individual premises. For low volume roll-out such as providing fibre connections to businesses this was not much of an issue, but with the plans to fibre up Bournemouth and Dundee as Fibre Cities under way, greater powers to carry out street works would simplify things.

Ofcom has now rubber stamped approval for H2O Networks to have street works powers which puts them on a level footing with other telecommunications companies. As deals are struck with Internet Service Providers we should start to see details of retail products emerge, the price and speed of services will be governed largely by the cost of getting the vast of amounts data a fibre network can consume and produce out onto the Internet.

Comments

Posted by CARPETBURN over 8 years ago
My god do i dare say for once ofcom have done something right... Hats off to H20 for working hard over the past few years developing their service and now rolling it out... Proof to the doubters it is actually possible and could actually lead to even more services supplied in a similar fashion.... I bet BT, Sky Virgin and a few others are watching to see how H20 go with interest.
Posted by c_j_ over 8 years ago
I'd wait for your "proof it is actually possible" till there are sufficient quantities of actual live customers using the service. After all, we wouldn't want this to go the same way as Scottish+Southern Electric's powerline broadband, would we - they were always "just a few weeks away from a full commercial rollout", even though the numbers didn't add up and the technology was inappropriate. And broadband alternatives like Netvigator/NOW/PCCW aren't exactly taking the country by storm are they?

http://www.ispreview.co.uk/articles/power/index.shtml
Posted by Somerset over 8 years ago
It will be interesting to see what they put in for people signing up in Bournemouth. Will it be duct to the edge of the property? How will they deal with properties where the drains are in back gardens?
Posted by comnut over 8 years ago
more research would reveal that they are only running it through 'manually maintainable' sewers... otherwise the cable would cause build up of debris, and any cleaning method would ruin the cable!!

Most of these main 'sanitary sewers' just follow the main street, with the smaller pipes connecting this to your garden drain cover..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_sewerage_system

http://www.london.ca/d.aspx?s=/Report_a_Problem/sewers_watermains.htm
Posted by CARPETBURN over 8 years ago
quote"I'd wait for your "proof it is actually possible" till there are sufficient quantities of actual live customers using the service."

Errr you do realise they were supplying a service before they even went anywhere near bournemouth, dont you?

Even if every one in bournemouth chewed H20s arm off obviously a service like this takes a while before it can be rolled out in large scale, the sheer amount of work and dotting and crossing the legal i's and t's is the reason why, the technology has been proven to work and has been tested for well over a year.
Posted by c_j_ over 8 years ago
They may have been supplying a service before Bournemouth but afaik it was an extremely small scale service with only a handful of point to point links. Not exactly a full commercial rollout of a "mass market" service at mass market prices.

Some of the technology is proven to work (though the last few yards between street and end user is still very unclear to me), but it's not just the technology that needs to work for the service to succeed, the economics (and indeed the legal niceties you mention) have to be right too.
Posted by lloydio over 8 years ago
I can confirm that work has been started in Bournemouth. Engineers were feeding cable through the sewerage system in the Littledown area of Bournemouth. Its definitely fibre as I asked one of the engineers.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 8 years ago
quote"Some of the technology is proven to work (though the last few yards between street and end user is still very unclear to me), but it's not just the technology that needs to work for the service to succeed, the economics (and indeed the legal niceties you mention) have to be right too. "
The last few yards i see a similar system to virgin... IE dig a hole a foot or so deep and run it along that. (CONT)
Posted by CARPETBURN over 8 years ago
Economics i agree something else entirely, If this is REAL top end fibre type speed (by that i mean minimum of 50Mb both ways) Id happily pay 3x more per month than the 25 quid i currently pay. I believe there is a market if the price and service is right (ya never convince a 10 quid a month 2Mb snail that though ;) ). The legal matters, getting permission can be a nightmare, i think we both agree on that, for a change its nice to see ofcom have not flapped about and instead gave atleast a PARTIAL green light
Posted by dragon1945 over 8 years ago
Won't ever get it here LOL. Too many rural areas like ours have no mains drainage. It's either cess pits or small sewerage macerator/filtration units that have to be emptied every 6 months.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 8 years ago
quote"Won't ever get it here LOL. Too many rural areas like ours have no mains drainage. It's either cess pits or small sewerage macerator/filtration units that have to be emptied every 6 months."

Oh i see its H20s fault now you country bumpkins dont have sewers... How enlightening.
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