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Ray of hope for those who cannot get ADSL
Wednesday 17 October 2007 10:46:07 by Andrew Ferguson

Openreach is often criticised about not doing enough to upgrade the existing copper telephone network. Some evidence of the extent it will goto to improve its network when a need is identified can be read about at EDP 24.

14 homes in Drymere near Swaffham, Norfolk were suffering from very long telephone lines that put them out of reach of an ADSL service. Openreach has used 50 telegraph poles and new cabling with optimised routing to decrease the cable distance and we suspect used a thicker copper cable than normal which helps to reduce attenuation and increases the chances of ADSL working. The work started in July 2007 and was completed some three weeks ago.

Long telephone lines can be an issue in rural areas with regards to getting a stable broadband connection.

Because of the concentration of customers in this area that are served on a long line from the Swaffham Exchange, Openreach took the decision that it was viable from a business perspective to undertake this remedial work.

BT spokesman Paul Hayward

The question now is whether this reflects a sea change inside Openreach and a greater willingness to do upgrade work to the copper local loop. There are plenty of small areas in the UK that suffer from lack of ADSL, but due to the relatively small number of phone lines in these areas the publicity and pressure to do anything is very small. The question now for those not able to get broadband, is how do you get Openreach to carry out similar work to what it has done in Norfolk in your area.

Comments

Posted by g-bhxu over 9 years ago
A few of questions

1) How many of the 14 homes wanted ADSL?

2) How long will it be before you get another group of householders complaining about the lack of ADSL?

3) How long will it be before one of these users is FUP'd?


Posted by CARPETBURN over 9 years ago
quote"Openreach has used 50 telegraph poles and new cabling with optimised routing to decrease the cable distance and we suspect used a thicker copper cable than normal which helps to reduce attenuation and increases the chances of ADSL working. The work started in July 2007 and was completed some three weeks ago."

LMFAO
1. Almost a year and a half to give 14 people broadband.
2. No promise it will give them broadband just a quote"increases the chances of ADSL working"
3. BT involved..........
Priceless!!!!
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 9 years ago
The words "increases the chances of ADSL working" are in relation to explaining why thick copper cable is a good thing to use. This combined with better routing etc one presumes gave Openreach enough confidence to go ahead with the work.

Since when was July to 3rd week of September almost half a year, I make that a worst case of just under 3 months, best case around 7 weeks.

Posted by 2doorsbob over 9 years ago
it's a shame BT can't share the same interest in removing all the alimunium from the local loop
Posted by mirzahome over 9 years ago
And of course Milton Keynes is an example of where it was felt prudent to install aluminium lines on masse - and on the cheap.

Many people here now pay the price - with those that can get broadband - typically getting speeds of around 512kbps to 1 meg.

Will BT Openreach now 'fix' the long lines problem here in Milton Keynes - one of the fastest growing Broadband areas in the country?
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 9 years ago
http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/i/2550.html

Council would appear to be going wireless.

http://www.bb4mk.org/wirelesstech.htm is best resource for the area
Posted by herdwick over 9 years ago
Does England need a notspot identification system like those in Scotland and Wales to facilitate Openreach addressing issues ?

The Community Broadband Network collated notspot data and verified it but there was little to no interest from Regional Development Agencies.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 9 years ago
quote"Since when was July to 3rd week of September almost half a year, I make that a worst case of just under 3 months, best case around 7 weeks."

If you EDP 24 link in the article our good friend BT spokesman Paul Hayward clearly states in the last paragraph that 3 months you mention is only the time spent doing the "physical work"... It doesnt include the time waiting for the thicker cable to be made, facade planning or anything else.
Posted by andrew (Favicon staff member) over 9 years ago
Do people ever wonder why sometimes nothing gets done? Maybe because its cheaper to do nothing and take the flak, than do what seems to be the right thing and still get the flak.

Posted by CARPETBURN over 9 years ago
I didnt say what they have done is a good or bad thing... however it does seem alot of effort just to supply 14 homes with broadband ability, i cant help but wonder what the final bill for the job will be and could that money have been spent better elsewhere?? I guess we will never know but i think thats a fair point.
Posted by alexdow over 9 years ago
Why was it copper, would a wireless link have worked?
Posted by CARPETBURN over 9 years ago
Good point alexdow... also given the current price of copper and the obvious work which was involved i wonder how the cost of fibre'ing the whole area whole have compared?
Posted by chrysalis over 9 years ago
BT are more puzzling by the day different signals coming out, correct me if I am wrong but they rerouted lines and used better cabling for 14 homes?!!! I am in a suburban area close to a major city centre and over 2000 homes cannot get adsl due to line length in the estate across the road from me. BT have repeatedly told the local rag that it isnt economically viable to fix the problem.
Posted by chrysalis over 9 years ago
"than do what seems to be the right thing and still get the flak"
Andrew you do seem to spend a lot of time defending BT when as a site admin its professional to not take a bias, but I will answer your question.
BT as a duty has to justify what it spends to its shareholder, if its going to spend money rerouting lines shouldnt it make sure (a) it "defenitly" enables adsl? (b)it uses fiber which would do this and is cheaper then copper now (c) pick areas that have more population than 14 houses.
Posted by PVTele over 9 years ago
As I see it Andrew <i>is</i> trying to be objective, in saying that there are two sides to every question, and that credit should be given where it's due, no matter to whom!

chrysalis, why do you say BT should, "pick areas that have more population than 14 houses"? Would you say that if you lived in one of those 14 houses?
Posted by rjohnloader over 9 years ago
Progress is wonderful - I used to string copper from poles. The conductors weighed 40lb per mile but when underground cable was used it was only 6.5lb/mile.
But surely wifi is what is required? Or line of sight radio
Posted by Skyewatcher over 9 years ago
I live on the Isle of Skye and BT are well aware of the lack of broadband in parts of Scotland. The only problem is that they are not prepared do do anything about it on the gounds that it is too costly. How much profit did BT make last year? Only when the Scottish government steps in and foots the bill was anything done. I was told the other day by a local BT engineer that some of the telephone cables were installed in 1938, no wonder my dial signal strenght is so lousy.
Posted by CARPETBURN over 9 years ago
LOL 1938... sounds about right kinda sums up the whole BT ethos of whore profits dont spend out.
Its a complete mystery why they spent whatever the finally figure was on these 14 homes... I imagine theres more to this than meets the eye and public pressure or even local authority came into somewhere along the line. There are massive whole areas in the UK unable or only able to get 512k at best broadband, it beggars the question why are they not spending money there?
Posted by Skyewatcher over 9 years ago
I forgot to mention that I live in a village of 20 homes, 12 of which have expressed a wish to have broadband, if we could get it. We live 7 miles from the exchange although BT reckon we are 14 km, I still can not work out that one. For now we have to put up with a very slow dial up service.
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