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More news on BT Wholesale Max DSL trials
Friday 04 March 2005 11:24:00 by Andrew Ferguson

Some more information has been published in the form of a Suppliers Trial Information Note (STIN) by BT on the forthcoming technical trials. The documents stress that the information at this time is describing the early stages of the technical trial, and any eventual product (if one does arise from the trial) may be substantially different. The fact that it is a technical trial means that BT Wholesale will be using it as an information gathering exercise, so any product details are very much subject to change.

The main information that can be gleamed from the documentation is that the services will be truly rate adaptive in both the upstream and downstream directions. The line rates for each product are shown below:


Downstream Speeds

Upstream Speeds

BT IPStream Home Max 2272kbps to 8128kbps 64kbps to 448kbps
BT IPStream Office Max 2272kbps to 8128kbps 64kbps to 832kbps
BT DataStream Office Max 448 2272kbps to 8128kbps 64kbps to 448kbps
BT DataStream Office Max 832 2272kbps to 8128kbps 64kbps to 832kbps
Line speeds are ATM cell rates in kilo bits per second

In an attempt to ensure people do not start to swamp service providers support/sales lines with calls to get onto the trial, we are also publishing some details on how the selection process will work for the trial. BT Wholesale will identify which circuits can subject to the usual survey receive the Max service, and only these on the exchanges BT select for the trial will be eligible. Service providers who register for the trial will receive a list of their customers who are eligible and then selection of users will commence. It would appear that only customers already receiving a 2Mbps service will be eligible for the Max trials.

BT Wholesale has also warned service providers to inform customers that data throughput may at peak times drop down to similar levels as you would expect on a 2Mbps service. This higher level of swing due to contention is not uncommon on faster products around the world, plus additionally as your line speeds increase you will notice other factors more, like speed of the server at the other end feeding data, and time it takes a computer to render the HTML page for example.


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